Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Effectiveness of tDCS to Improve Recognition and Reduce False Memories in Older Adults

Version 1 : Received: 26 December 2020 / Approved: 28 December 2020 / Online: 28 December 2020 (11:15:38 CET)

How to cite: Melendez, J.C.; Satorres, E.; Pitarque, A.; Delhom, I.; Real, E.; Escudero, J. Effectiveness of tDCS to Improve Recognition and Reduce False Memories in Older Adults. Preprints 2020, 2020120683 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202012.0683.v1). Melendez, J.C.; Satorres, E.; Pitarque, A.; Delhom, I.; Real, E.; Escudero, J. Effectiveness of tDCS to Improve Recognition and Reduce False Memories in Older Adults. Preprints 2020, 2020120683 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202012.0683.v1).

Abstract

Background. False memories tend to increase in healthy and pathological aging, and their reduction could be useful in improving cognitive functioning. The objective was to use an active-placebo method to verify whether the application of tDCS in improving true recognition and reducing false memories in healthy older people. Method. Participants were 29 healthy older adults (65-78 years old) assigned to active or placebo group; active group received anodal stimulation at 2mA for 20 min over F7. An experimental task was used to estimate true and false recognition. The procedure took place in two sessions on two consecutive days. Results. A mixed ANOVA of true recognition showed a significant main effect of session (p = .004), indicating an increase from before treatment to after it. False recognition showed a significant main effect (p = .004), indicating a decrease from before treatment to after it and a significant session x group interaction (p < .0001). Conclusions. Overall, our results show that tDCS is an effective tool for increasing true recognition and reducing false recognition in healthy older people, and suggest that stimulation improves recall by increasing the number of items a participant can recall and reducing the number of memory errors.

Subject Areas

transcranial direct current stimulation; true recognition; false recognition; aging; experiment.

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