Working Paper Article Version 2 This version is not peer-reviewed

Detection and Imaging of Damages and Defects in Fibre-Reinforced Composites by Resonance Magnetic Technique

Version 1 : Received: 20 December 2019 / Approved: 22 December 2019 / Online: 22 December 2019 (10:55:03 CET)
Version 2 : Received: 12 August 2020 / Approved: 20 August 2020 / Online: 20 August 2020 (04:05:00 CEST)

How to cite: Alves, C.; Oliveira, J.; Tannus, A.; Tarpani, A.; Tarpani, J. Detection and Imaging of Damages and Defects in Fibre-Reinforced Composites by Resonance Magnetic Technique. Preprints 2019, 2019120295 Alves, C.; Oliveira, J.; Tannus, A.; Tarpani, A.; Tarpani, J. Detection and Imaging of Damages and Defects in Fibre-Reinforced Composites by Resonance Magnetic Technique. Preprints 2019, 2019120295

Abstract

Defectively manufactured and deliberately damaged composite laminates fabricated with different continuous reinforcing fibres (respectively, carbon and glass) and polymer matrices (respectively, thermoset and thermoplastic) were inspected in magnetic resonance imaging equipment. Two pulse sequences were evaluated during non-destructive examination conducted in saline solution-immersed samples to simulate load-bearing orthopaedic implants permanently in contact with biofluids. The orientation, positioning, shape, and especially the size of translaminar and delamination fractures were determined according to stringent structural assessment criteria. The spatial distribution, shape, and contours of water-filled voids were sufficiently delineated to infer the amount of absorbed water if thinner image slices than this study were used. The surface texture of composite specimens featuring roughness, waviness, indentation, crushing, and scratches was outlined, with fortuitous artefacts not impairing the image quality and interpretation. Low electromagnetic shielding glass fibres delivered the highest, while electrically conductive carbon fibres produced the poorest quality images, particularly when blended with thermoplastic polymer, though reliable image interpretation was still attainable.

Subject Areas

damage and defect assessment; magnetic resonance imaging; polymer matrix composite

Comments (1)

Comment 1
Received: 20 August 2020
Commenter: José Tarpani
Commenter's Conflict of Interests: Author
Comment: This is the ready-to-publish version after a series of review-and-revison rounds before paper acceptation by Materials
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