Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Limited Cross-Shelf Variation in the Growth of Three Branching Corals on Australia’s Great Barrier Reef

Version 1 : Received: 16 September 2018 / Approved: 17 September 2018 / Online: 17 September 2018 (11:13:20 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Burn, D.; Pratchett, M.S.; Heron, S.F.; Thompson, C.A.; Pratchett, D.J.; Hoey, A.S. Limited Cross-Shelf Variation in the Growth of Three Branching Corals on Australia’s Great Barrier Reef. Diversity 2018, 10, 122. Burn, D.; Pratchett, M.S.; Heron, S.F.; Thompson, C.A.; Pratchett, D.J.; Hoey, A.S. Limited Cross-Shelf Variation in the Growth of Three Branching Corals on Australia’s Great Barrier Reef. Diversity 2018, 10, 122.

Journal reference: Diversity 2018, 10, 122
DOI: 10.3390/d10040122

Abstract

Pronounced differences exist in the biodiversity and structure of coral reef assemblages with increasing distance from shore, which may be expected given marked cross-shelf gradients in environmental conditions. Cross-shelf variation in the abundance of coral reef organisms is likely to be caused, at least in part, by differences in demography (e.g., growth and survival), though this has rarely been tested. This study quantified growth of three distinct coral taxa (Acropora nasuta, Pocillopora spp., and Stylophora pistillata) at 6 sites on Australia’s Great Barrier Reef (GBR), encompassing inshore, mid-shelf and outer-shelf reefs. Replicate colonies (up to 15 colonies per species, per reef) were stained using Alizarin red in December 2015 and retrieved 1-year later to quantify linear extension on replicate branches for each colony. Annual linear extension varied within and among coral taxa, with pronounced differences among reefs. For A. nausta. and S. pistillata, growth rates were highest at Orpheus Island, which is an inner shelf reef. However, inter-reef differences in coral growth were not explained by shelf position. Based on differences in skeletal density, which did vary according to shelf position, branching corals at the inshore sites may actually have higher rates of calcification compared to conspecifics on mid- and outer-shelf reefs. This study shows that growth of branching corals is not lower at inshore sites (and perhaps even higher) compared to sites at mid-shelf and outer reefs, despite generally higher levels of sedimentation and turbidity.

Subject Areas

annual linear extension; calcification; coral reefs; environmental gradients; growth; turbidity

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