Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Solanum elaeagnifolium and S. rostratum as Potential Hosts of the Tomato Brown Rugose Fruit Virus

Version 1 : Received: 1 August 2022 / Approved: 3 August 2022 / Online: 3 August 2022 (08:35:30 CEST)

How to cite: Matzrafi, M.; Abu-Nassar, J.; Klap, C.; Smith, E.; Dombrovsky, A. Solanum elaeagnifolium and S. rostratum as Potential Hosts of the Tomato Brown Rugose Fruit Virus. Preprints 2022, 2022080079 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202208.0079.v1). Matzrafi, M.; Abu-Nassar, J.; Klap, C.; Smith, E.; Dombrovsky, A. Solanum elaeagnifolium and S. rostratum as Potential Hosts of the Tomato Brown Rugose Fruit Virus. Preprints 2022, 2022080079 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202208.0079.v1).

Abstract

Invasive weeds cause significant crop yield and economic losses in agriculture. The highest in-direct impact may be attributed to the role of invasive weeds as virus reservoirs especially within the commercial growing areas. The new tobamovirus tomato brown rugose fruit virus (ToBRFV), recently identified in the Middle-East, overcomes the Tm-22 resistance allele in the cultivated tomato varieties grown in greenhouses. In this study, we determined the role of invasive weed species as potential hosts for ToBRFV and pepino mosaic virus (PepMV). Out of all tested weed species, the invasive species So-lanum elaeagnifolium and S. rostratum, mechanically inoculated with ToBRFV, were positive for To-BRFV in both enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and RT-PCR tests. S. rostratum was also positive for PepMV. No conspicuous phenotype was observed on ToBRFV infected S. elaeagnifolium plants suggesting a hostplant associated defense response. S. rostratum plants inoculated with either ToBRFV alone or a mixture of ToBRFV and PepMV-IL, contained high ToBRFV levels. In addition, when inoculated with ToBRFV or PepMV-IL disease symptom manifestations were observed in S. rostratum plants and the symptoms were exacerbated upon mixed infections with both viruses. The distribution and abundance of both Solanaceae species increase the risks of virus transmission between species.

Keywords

pepino mosaic virus (PepMV); Solanum elaeagnifolium; S. rostratum; tomato brown rugose fruit virus (To-BRFV); virus reservoir; weed management

Subject

BIOLOGY, Agricultural Sciences & Agronomy

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