Preprint Article Version 2 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Seasonal Dynamics of Organic Carbon and Nitrogen in Biomasses of Microorganisms in Arable Mollisols Affected by Different Tillage Systems

Version 1 : Received: 21 December 2021 / Approved: 23 December 2021 / Online: 23 December 2021 (11:51:57 CET)
Version 2 : Received: 18 February 2022 / Approved: 21 February 2022 / Online: 21 February 2022 (12:05:40 CET)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Kravchenko, Y.S.; Zhang, X.; Song, C.; Hu, W.; Yarosh, A.V.; Voitsekhivska, O.V. Seasonal Dynamics of Organic Carbon and Nitrogen in Biomasses of Microorganisms in Arable Mollisols Affected by Different Tillage Systems. Land 2022, 11, 486. Kravchenko, Y.S.; Zhang, X.; Song, C.; Hu, W.; Yarosh, A.V.; Voitsekhivska, O.V. Seasonal Dynamics of Organic Carbon and Nitrogen in Biomasses of Microorganisms in Arable Mollisols Affected by Different Tillage Systems. Land 2022, 11, 486.

Journal reference: Land 2022, 11, 486
DOI: 10.3390/land11040486

Abstract

Tillage has been reported to induce seasonal changes of organic carbon (Сmicro) and nitrogen (Nmicro) in biomass of microorganisms. Soil microorganisms execute such ecosystem functions as: it is an immediate sink of labile biophil elements; it is an agent of a conversion, catalysis and synthesis of humus substances; it transforms soil contaminants into non-hazardous wastes; it participates in soil aggregation and pedogenesis as a whole. However, the seasonal turnover of microorganisms on arable lands in temperate ecosystems has not been investigated on a relevant level. Hence, we aimed to study the dynamics of such soil microbial biomass patterns as: Сmicro, Nmicro, microbial index (MI = (Сmicro/CTOC)·100, %) and CO2-C emission on the background of 9 years of tillage and 22 years of abandoned (Ab) and fallow (F) usage. Our study was conducted on a long-term experimental site on a Mollisol in the northeast China. The maximum Сmicro and Nmicro content was found: at the beginning of the growing season – in 0-10-; in mid-July – in 20-40 cm layers, while the minimum – in August-October. The Сmicro content ranged from 577.79- and 381.79 mg-1 kg-1 under Ab in spring to 229.53- and 272.86 mg-1 kg-1 in autumn under CT (conventional tillage) and F in 0-10- and 10-20 cm layers, respectively. The amplitude of Nmicro content changes was several times lower comparatively to Сmicro. The smallest quartile range (IQR0.25-0.75) of such changes was under: no-till (NT) and Ab in 0-10-, NT and F – in 10-20- and CT - in 20-40 cm layers. The widest Сmicro : Nmicro ratio was found at F and CT – in 0-20- and CT and rotational tillage (Rot) – in 20-40 cm layers. MI dynamics resembled the trends of Сmicro and Nmicro and changed from 0.72  0.168- tо 2.00  0,030 %. The highest part of Сmicro in CTOC was at Ab (1.82  1.85 %) and NT (1.66  1.52 %) – in 0-10-; Ab (1.23  1.27 %) and NT (1.29  1.32 %) – in 10-20- and – Ab (1.19  1.09 %) and F (1.11  1.077 %) – in 20-40 cm layers, correspondingly. The Pearson’s correlation coefficient between Сmicro and CTOC increased from the upper 0-10- to the lower 20-40 cm layer, it was "strong" and "high" between Сmicro and CTOC. Different use of Mollisol affected the amplitude of Сmicro and Nmicro seasonal changes, but it didn’t change their trend. Our results suggest the key role of Ab and NT technologies in Сmicro accumulation in total organic carbon (TOC).

Keywords

Mollisol; soil organic matter; microorganisms; microbial index; crop growing season

Subject

BIOLOGY, Agricultural Sciences & Agronomy

Comments (1)

Comment 1
Received: 21 February 2022
Commenter: Yuriy Kravchenko
Commenter's Conflict of Interests: Author
Comment: -
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