Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Versatile Cell and Animal Models for Advanced Investigation of Lead Poisoning

Version 1 : Received: 23 August 2021 / Approved: 25 August 2021 / Online: 25 August 2021 (10:39:42 CEST)
Version 2 : Received: 17 September 2021 / Approved: 17 September 2021 / Online: 17 September 2021 (11:58:04 CEST)
Version 3 : Received: 1 October 2021 / Approved: 1 October 2021 / Online: 1 October 2021 (11:12:13 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Yang, D.-M.; Chang, Y.-F. Versatile Cell and Animal Models for Advanced Investigation of Lead Poisoning. Biosensors 2021, 11, 371. Yang, D.-M.; Chang, Y.-F. Versatile Cell and Animal Models for Advanced Investigation of Lead Poisoning. Biosensors 2021, 11, 371.

Journal reference: Biosensors 2021, 11, 371
DOI: 10.3390/bios11100371

Abstract

The heavy metal lead (Pb) can irreversibly damage the human nervous system. To help understand Pb-induced damage, we have developed practical applications for genetically encoded Pb biosensors in cardiac cells and insect central nervous tissue. We applied the optimized fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based Pb biosensor Met-lead 1.44 M1 to two living systems to monitor the concentration of Pb: induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived cardiomyocytes as a semi-tissue platform, and Drosophila melanogaster fruit flies as an in vivo animal model. Different FRET imaging modalities were used to obtain FRET signals, which repre-sented the presence of Pb in the tested samples in different spatial dimensions. Pb was effectively sensed in two living models producing Met-led 1.44 M1. In iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes, the relationship between beating rate determined from the fluctuation of fluorescent signals and the concentrations of Pb represented by the FRET emission ratio values of Met-lead 1.44 M1 demonstrated the potential of this fluorescence biosensor system for anti-Pb drug screening. In the Drosophila model, Pb was detected within the adult brain or larval central nervous system using fast epifluorescence and high-resolution two-photon 3D FRET ratio image sys-tems. The optimized Pb biosensor together with FRET microscopy can be used for specific applications to de-tect Pb with a limit of detection of 10 nM (2 ppb). We believe that this integrated Pb biosensor system can be applied to the prevention of Pb poisoning.

Keywords

Drosophila melanogaster; fluorescence resonance energy transfer; Met-lead 1.44 M1; Pb biosensor

Subject

LIFE SCIENCES, Biotechnology

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