Preprint Review Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Vector-focused Approaches to Curb Malaria Transmission in the Brazilian Amazon: An Overview of Current and Future Challenges and Strategies

Version 1 : Received: 22 September 2020 / Approved: 23 September 2020 / Online: 23 September 2020 (15:26:43 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Rocha, E.M.; Katak, R.M.; Campos de Oliveira, J.; Araujo, M.S.; Carlos, B.C.; Galizi, R.; Tripet, F.; Marinotti, O.; Souza-Neto, J.A. Vector-Focused Approaches to Curb Malaria Transmission in the Brazilian Amazon: An Overview of Current and Future Challenges and Strategies. Trop. Med. Infect. Dis. 2020, 5, 161. Rocha, E.M.; Katak, R.M.; Campos de Oliveira, J.; Araujo, M.S.; Carlos, B.C.; Galizi, R.; Tripet, F.; Marinotti, O.; Souza-Neto, J.A. Vector-Focused Approaches to Curb Malaria Transmission in the Brazilian Amazon: An Overview of Current and Future Challenges and Strategies. Trop. Med. Infect. Dis. 2020, 5, 161.

Journal reference: Trop. Med. Infect. Dis. 2020, 5, 161
DOI: 10.3390/tropicalmed5040161

Abstract

In Brazil, malaria transmission is mostly confined to the Amazon, where substantial progress has been achieved towards disease control in the past decade. Vector control has been historically considered a fundamental part of the main malaria control programs implemented in Brazil. However, the conventional vector-control tools have been insufficient to eliminate local vector populations due to the complexity of the Amazonian rainforest environment and ecological features of malaria vector species in the Amazon, especially Anopheles darlingi. Malaria elimination in Brazil and worldwide eradication will require a combination of conventional and new approaches that takes into account the regional specificities of vector populations and malaria transmission dynamics. Here we present an overview on both conventional and novel promising vector-focused tools to curb malaria transmission in the Brazilian Amazon. If well designed and employed, these new vector-based approaches may improve the implementation of malaria-control programs, particularly in remote or difficult-to-access areas and in regions where existing interventions have been unable to eliminate disease transmission. However, much effort still has to be put on research expanding the knowledge of neotropical malaria vectors to set the steppingstones for the development of such innovative tools.

Subject Areas

Malaria; Amazon; Brazil; Anopheles darlingi; Plasmodium; Control; Challenges; Strategies; Conventional; Novel; Vector; Mosquito

Comments (0)

We encourage comments and feedback from a broad range of readers. See criteria for comments and our diversity statement.

Leave a public comment
Send a private comment to the author(s)
Views 0
Downloads 0
Comments 0
Metrics 0


×
Alerts
Notify me about updates to this article or when a peer-reviewed version is published.
We use cookies on our website to ensure you get the best experience.
Read more about our cookies here.