Preprint Review Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Perceptual-cognitive Function and Unplanned Athletic Movement Task Performance: A Systematic Review

Version 1 : Received: 17 August 2020 / Approved: 18 August 2020 / Online: 18 August 2020 (16:32:00 CEST)

How to cite: Wilke, J.; Groneberg, D.; Banzer, W.; Giesche, F. Perceptual-cognitive Function and Unplanned Athletic Movement Task Performance: A Systematic Review. Preprints 2020, 2020080394 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202008.0394.v1). Wilke, J.; Groneberg, D.; Banzer, W.; Giesche, F. Perceptual-cognitive Function and Unplanned Athletic Movement Task Performance: A Systematic Review. Preprints 2020, 2020080394 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202008.0394.v1).

Abstract

The performance of choice-reaction tasks during athletic movement has been demonstrated to evoke unfavorable lower limb biomechanics. However, the mechanism of this observation is unknown. We conducted a systematic review examining the association between 1) the biomechanical and functional safety of unplanned sports-related movements (e.g. jumps/runs with spontaneously indicated landing leg/cutting direction) and 2) markers of perceptual-cognitive function (PGF). A literature search in three databases (Pubmed, ScienceDirect, Google Scholar) identified five relevant articles. Study quality, rated by means of a modified Downs & Black checklist, was moderate to high (average: 13.5/16 points). Four of five papers, in at least one parameter, found either an association of lower PGF and reduced task safety or significantly reduced task safety in low vs. high PGF performers. Yet, as a) the outcomes, populations and statistical methods of the included trials were highly heterogeneous and b) only two out of five studies had an adequate control condition (pre-planned movement task), evidence was classified as conflicting. In sum, PGF may represent a factor increasing injury risk during unplanned sports-related movements but future research strengthening the evidence of this association is warranted.

Subject Areas

unanticipated; decision-making; brain function; sports; athletes; cognition

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