Working Paper Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Is Reduced Planck’s Constant- An Outcome of Electroweak Gravity?

Version 1 : Received: 14 December 2019 / Approved: 17 December 2019 / Online: 17 December 2019 (11:02:26 CET)
Version 2 : Received: 22 December 2019 / Approved: 22 December 2019 / Online: 22 December 2019 (14:23:52 CET)

How to cite: Seshavatharam, U.; Lakshminarayana, S. Is Reduced Planck’s Constant- An Outcome of Electroweak Gravity?. Preprints 2019, 2019120231 Seshavatharam, U.; Lakshminarayana, S. Is Reduced Planck’s Constant- An Outcome of Electroweak Gravity?. Preprints 2019, 2019120231

Abstract

To understand the mystery of final unification, in our earlier publications, we proposed that there exist three atomic gravitational constants associated with electroweak, strong and electromagnetic interactions. During cosmic evolution, if one is willing to give equal importance to Higgs boson and Planck mass in understanding the massive origin of elementary particles, then it seems quite logical to expect a common relation in between Planck scale and Electroweak scale. Based on these two points, we noticed that, electroweak field seems to be operated by a primordial massive fermion of rest energy 585 GeV. It can be considered as the zygote of all elementary particles and galactic dark matter. H-bar seems to be a characteristic outcome of unified electroweak gravity. Electron rest mass seems to be a characteristic outcome of electroweak and strong gravity. Proton rest mass seems to be a characteristic outcome of electroweak, strong and electromagnetic gravity. Recently observed 3.5 keV photon seems to be an outcome of annihilation of charged baby lepton of rest energy 1.75 keV. Interesting point to be noted is that, Schwarzschild radius of electron is 0.48 nanometer and it needs further investigation with respect to emerging nano-science and technology.

Subject Areas

four gravitational constants; electroweak fermion; reduced Planck’s constant; stellar mass limits; 3.5 keV photon

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