Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Alien Species vs. Native Species: From Community Ecology to Eco-Evolutionary Dynamics

Version 1 : Received: 12 April 2019 / Approved: 16 April 2019 / Online: 16 April 2019 (12:50:43 CEST)

How to cite: Prestes, A.S. Alien Species vs. Native Species: From Community Ecology to Eco-Evolutionary Dynamics. Preprints 2019, 2019040189 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201904.0189.v1). Prestes, A.S. Alien Species vs. Native Species: From Community Ecology to Eco-Evolutionary Dynamics. Preprints 2019, 2019040189 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201904.0189.v1).

Abstract

The establishment and spread of exotic species is a contemporary major concern. Alien species may become invasive in their new habitat, leading to both/either environmental and/or economic impacts. I briefly reviewed the literature in the last decade about the relationship of exotic species and native communities. I identified that professionals usually approach the subject in two main points of view: (1) researchers tend to point out the impacts of alien species on entire communities, evaluating if the relationship is positive, negative or neutral; (2) they focus on the eco-evolutionary processes involved in the introductions, the dynamics of invasion, and individual study cases. When evaluating the response of introductions to entire communities, evidence seems to be ambiguous and may support positive, negative or neutral relationship, especially depending on the scale approached. The unique eco-evolutionary pathways of each introduction may be a great shortcoming in the searching for generalities. On the other hand, advances have been made in understanding the dynamics of invasion on different lineages through a more selective/individualized approach. I suggest that the dynamics of invasion might be studied through a perspective in which different eco-evolutionary processes, levels of organization (from gene to entire communities), the history of the organism(s) and time are taken into account. Individual cases might be compared in attempt to understand how the relationship exotic and native works and in the search for generalities.

Subject Areas

exotic species; native communities; biological invasion; dynamics of invasion

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