Preprint Communication Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Psychological Pressure Distorts High Jumpers’ Perception of the Height of the Bar

Version 1 : Received: 23 April 2018 / Approved: 23 April 2018 / Online: 23 April 2018 (12:59:28 CEST)

How to cite: Tanaka, Y.; Sasaki, J.; Karakida, K.; Goto, K.; Tanaka, Y.M.; Murayama, T. Psychological Pressure Distorts High Jumpers’ Perception of the Height of the Bar. Preprints 2018, 2018040299 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201804.0299.v1). Tanaka, Y.; Sasaki, J.; Karakida, K.; Goto, K.; Tanaka, Y.M.; Murayama, T. Psychological Pressure Distorts High Jumpers’ Perception of the Height of the Bar. Preprints 2018, 2018040299 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201804.0299.v1).

Abstract

The effects of psychological pressure on perceiving the height of a jump bar just before starting a high jump run was investigated. University students (N = 14) training for a high jump event performed 15 trials (3 practice, 6 pressure, and 6 non-pressure) in counterbalanced order in their daily practice environment. The height of the bar was judged as significantly higher on pressure trials compared to non-pressure trials. A regression analysis indicated that participants who reported increased subjective perceived pressure tended to judge the bar to be higher. There was no significant difference between pressure and non-pressure trials for the performance index, defined as the success rate. This study provides the first evidence that environmental perceptions prior to executing a motor task under pressure may make performance of the task appear to be more difficult.

Subject Areas

action-specific perception; dynamic perception; high jump; psychological stress

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