Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Quantifying the National Significance of Local Areas for Regional Conservation Planning: North Carolina’s Mountain Treasures

Version 1 : Received: 27 April 2017 / Approved: 28 April 2017 / Online: 28 April 2017 (05:19:35 CEST)
Version 2 : Received: 26 May 2017 / Approved: 29 May 2017 / Online: 29 May 2017 (10:58:00 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Belote, R.T.; Irwin, G.H. Quantifying the National Significance of Local Areas for Regional Conservation Planning: North Carolina’s Mountain Treasures. Land 2017, 6, 35. Belote, R.T.; Irwin, G.H. Quantifying the National Significance of Local Areas for Regional Conservation Planning: North Carolina’s Mountain Treasures. Land 2017, 6, 35.

Journal reference: Land 2017, 6, 35
DOI: 10.3390/land6020035

Abstract

Conservation scientists recognize that additional protected areas are needed to maintain biological diversity and ecological processes. As regional conservation planners embark on recommending additional areas for protection in formal conservation reserves, it is important to evaluate candidate lands for their role in building a resilient protected areas system of the future. Here, we evaluate North Carolina’s Mountain Treasures with respect to their (i) ecological integrity, (ii) role in connecting existing core protected areas, (iii) potential to diversify the ecosystem representation of reserves, and (iv) role in maintaining hotspots of biologically-rich areas not well protected. Mountain Treasures represent a citizen inventory of roadless areas and serve as candidates for elevated levels of conservation protection on U.S. federal lands. We compared Mountain Treasures to other candidate lands throughout the country to evaluate their potential national significance. While the Mountain Treasures tended to be more impacted by human modifications than other roadless areas, they are as important as other roadless areas with respect to their role in connecting existing protected areas and diversifying representation of ecosystems in conservation reserves. However, Mountain Treasures tended to have a much higher biodiversity priority index than other roadless areas leading to an overall higher composite score compared to other roadless areas. Our analysis serves as an example of how using broad-scale datasets can help conservation planners assess the national significance of local areas.

Subject Areas

biodiversity; connectivity; ecological integrity; Mountain Treasures; protected areas; Southern Appalachian Mountains

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