Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

The Root Proteomes of Mimosa acutistipula Provide Insights into the Stress Response Mechanisms in Plants Grown in Native Ecosystems and Eastern Amazon's Rehabilitating Minelands

Version 1 : Received: 16 September 2022 / Approved: 22 September 2022 / Online: 22 September 2022 (13:34:43 CEST)

How to cite: Nascimento, S.V.D.; Herrera, H.; Costa, P.H.D.O.; Trindade, F.C.; Da Costa, I.R.C.; Caldeira, C.F.; Gastauer, M.; Ramos, S.J.; Oliveira, G.; Valadares, R.B.D.S. The Root Proteomes of Mimosa acutistipula Provide Insights into the Stress Response Mechanisms in Plants Grown in Native Ecosystems and Eastern Amazon's Rehabilitating Minelands. Preprints 2022, 2022090345 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202209.0345.v1). Nascimento, S.V.D.; Herrera, H.; Costa, P.H.D.O.; Trindade, F.C.; Da Costa, I.R.C.; Caldeira, C.F.; Gastauer, M.; Ramos, S.J.; Oliveira, G.; Valadares, R.B.D.S. The Root Proteomes of Mimosa acutistipula Provide Insights into the Stress Response Mechanisms in Plants Grown in Native Ecosystems and Eastern Amazon's Rehabilitating Minelands. Preprints 2022, 2022090345 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202209.0345.v1).

Abstract

Mimosa acutistipula is endemic to Brazil and grows in ferruginous outcrops (canga) in Serra dos Carajás, eastern Amazon, where one of the largest iron ore deposits in the world is located. Plants that develop in these ecosystems are subject to severe environmental conditions and must have adaptive mechanisms to grow and thrive in cangas. Mimosa acutistipula is a native species used to restore biodiversity in post-mining areas in canga. Understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in the adaptation of M. acutistipula in canga is essential to deduce the ability of native species to adapt to possible stressors in rehabilitating minelands over time. In this study, the root proteomic profiles of M. acutistipula grown in a native canga ecosystem and rehabilitating minelands were compared to identify essential proteins involved in the adaptation of this species in its native environment and that should enable its establishment in rehabilitating minelands. The results showed differentially abundant proteins, where 436 proteins with significant values (p < 0.05) and fold change ≥ 2 were more abundant in canga and 145 in roots from the rehabilitating minelands. Among them, a representative amount and diversity of proteins were related to responses to water deficit, heat, and responses to metal ions. Other identified proteins are involved in biocontrol activity against phytopathogens and symbiosis. This research provides insights into proteins involved in M. acutistipula responses to environmental stimuli, suggesting critical mechanisms to support the establishment of native canga plants in rehabilitating minelands over time.

Keywords

Abiotic Stress; Amazon; Canga; Iron mining; Mineland Rehabilitation; Proteomics; Symbiosis

Subject

BIOLOGY, Ecology

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