Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Adaption of the Meat Attachment Scale (MEAS) to Germany - Interplay with Food Neophobia, Preference for Organic Foods, Social Trust and Trust in Food Technology Innovations

Version 1 : Received: 25 April 2022 / Approved: 27 April 2022 / Online: 27 April 2022 (03:45:28 CEST)

How to cite: Kühn, D.; Profeta, A.; Krikser, T.; Mehlhose, C.; Kircher, C.; Heinz, V. Adaption of the Meat Attachment Scale (MEAS) to Germany - Interplay with Food Neophobia, Preference for Organic Foods, Social Trust and Trust in Food Technology Innovations. Preprints 2022, 2022040246 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202204.0246.v1). Kühn, D.; Profeta, A.; Krikser, T.; Mehlhose, C.; Kircher, C.; Heinz, V. Adaption of the Meat Attachment Scale (MEAS) to Germany - Interplay with Food Neophobia, Preference for Organic Foods, Social Trust and Trust in Food Technology Innovations. Preprints 2022, 2022040246 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202204.0246.v1).

Abstract

Meat-based diets are still the norm and vegans and vegetarians represent only a small minority of the population. A transition respectively behavioural change towards a diet with less meat can only occur with the adoption of a positive attitude towards dietary changes based on reasons and motivations. The main aim of this study is to validate the so-called meat attachment scale (MEAS) for Germany in order to analyse if this construct is a barrier towards a diet with less meat in this country. The findings show that the MEAS can be applied in Germany and a similar structure as reported for Spain and other countries could be found. Furthermore, a correlation analysis demonstrated that food neophobia and MEAS are not correlated with each other. That is, that meat attachment represents an independent and single predictor for trust in food (processing) technologies as e.g. plant-based proteins or cultured meat.

Keywords

meat attachment; food neophobia; consumer preference; preference for organic foods

Subject

BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES, Social Psychology

Comments (0)

We encourage comments and feedback from a broad range of readers. See criteria for comments and our diversity statement.

Leave a public comment
Send a private comment to the author(s)
Views 0
Downloads 0
Comments 0
Metrics 0


×
Alerts
Notify me about updates to this article or when a peer-reviewed version is published.
We use cookies on our website to ensure you get the best experience.
Read more about our cookies here.