Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Solar Radiation in Architectural Projects as a Key Design Factor for the Recovery of Alzheimer’s Outpatients

Version 1 : Received: 9 April 2022 / Approved: 12 April 2022 / Online: 12 April 2022 (12:24:36 CEST)

How to cite: Almodovar-Melendo, J.; Quesada-García, S.; Valero, P.; Cabeza-Lainez, J. Solar Radiation in Architectural Projects as a Key Design Factor for the Recovery of Alzheimer’s Outpatients. Preprints 2022, 2022040113 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202204.0113.v1). Almodovar-Melendo, J.; Quesada-García, S.; Valero, P.; Cabeza-Lainez, J. Solar Radiation in Architectural Projects as a Key Design Factor for the Recovery of Alzheimer’s Outpatients. Preprints 2022, 2022040113 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202204.0113.v1).

Abstract

The beneficial effects of solar radiation on human health are well documented. One necessary mechanism triggers the production of vitamin D whose insufficiency has been linked to a variety of disorders like diabetes, hypertension and more recently amyloidosis and Alzheimer disease. However, there are few architectural designs capable on ensuring adequate provision of solar radiation inside buildings. Conventional fenestration is not sufficient to provide for significant doses of sunlight even to prevent seasonal affective disorder (SAD). In this paper we discuss the effect of new design alternatives for skylights, especially in the refurbishment of obsolete facilities. After such complex retrofit is executed, we have analyzed the performance of a building in warm and sunny climates as is the case of southern Spain. It has been considered as a priority the study of the factors that relate sunlight and energy, as well as, to a certain extent, other aspects like ventilation and insulation. Many architectural designs are presented as correct if the thermal requirements alone are met, even at the risk of later energy waste in lighting devices and visual or physical discomfort. On the other hand, large glazed areas allow more daylight into a space, but they may also allow excessive heat gains or losses which increase the air-conditioning cooling or heating load. To avoid these problems, we have considered the combined effect of daylight and energy from the beginning of the skylight design-process. A daylighting software based on configuration factors that we have apply in former researches to study the problems of direct sun over architectural structures have been used. This question cannot be treated adequately with conventional programs for overcast skies. The skylights have already been constructed and on-site measurements in the offices have been taken to complement the computer simulations data. The results show that it is possible to achieve energy saving and high radiation levels in winter without increasing heat loads during the summer. All this is considered beneficial to improve the condition of users with cognitive diseases as Alzheimer’s disease by virtue of adapted spaces.

Keywords

Alzheimer's disease; daylighting simulation; radiative exchanges; design strategies; healthy architecture

Subject

ARTS & HUMANITIES, Architecture and Design

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