Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

The Collective Mind: An Experimental Analysis of Imitation and Self‑organization in Humans

Version 1 : Received: 19 March 2022 / Approved: 23 March 2022 / Online: 23 March 2022 (12:36:52 CET)

How to cite: Olarewaju, E. The Collective Mind: An Experimental Analysis of Imitation and Self‑organization in Humans. Preprints 2022, 2022030316 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202203.0316.v1). Olarewaju, E. The Collective Mind: An Experimental Analysis of Imitation and Self‑organization in Humans. Preprints 2022, 2022030316 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202203.0316.v1).

Abstract

I present an experimental paradigm to explore the interpersonal dynamics generating a collective mind. I hypothesized that collective organization is based on dual interpersonal modes: (1) symmetrical and (2) anti‑symmetrical. I specified the geometric topology of these modes by detecting the spatiotemporal patterns that embed cooperative agents in a three‑dimensional matrix. I found that the symmetrical mode is executed automatically and without guidance. Conversely, the anti‑symmetrical mode required explicit direction and recruited attention for execution. I demonstrate that self‑other mirror‑symmetry stabilized group dynamics, enabled fast and efficient symmetrical imitation that optimized information transmission, whereas anti‑symmetrical imitation was comparatively slow, inefficient, and unstable. I determined that the anti‑symmetrical mode spontaneously transitioned to the symmetrical mode under perturbations. Crucially, this renormalization mechanism never transitioned from symmetrical to anti‑symmetrical. These self-organizing dynamics speak to interpersonal symmetry‑breaking. In the present work, spontaneous group choice mandated that agents synchronize cooperative cycles in symmetrical space under internal or external perturbations. I provide examples to illustrate that this self-regulating pullback attractor manifests in invertebrates and vertebrates alike. I conclude by suggesting that inter‑agent symmetry provides the social stability manifold through which attention-driven interactions enable intrapersonal and interpersonal change.

Keywords

1; Social interaction 2; Self-organization 3; Imitation 4; Coordination dynamics 5; Group nor-malization 6; Interpersonal symmetry

Subject

BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES, Cognitive & Experimental Psychology

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