Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

What Makes Small-Scale Fishers Resilient? Lessons from the Coping Strategies under COVID-19 Outbreak Observed in Trang Province, Thailand

Version 1 : Received: 18 January 2022 / Approved: 19 January 2022 / Online: 19 January 2022 (14:20:19 CET)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Arai, Y.; Sanlee, M.; Uehara, M.; Iwasaki, S. Perceived Impact of COVID-19 on Small-Scale Fishers of Trang Province, Thailand and Their Coping Strategies. Sustainability 2022, 14, 2865. Arai, Y.; Sanlee, M.; Uehara, M.; Iwasaki, S. Perceived Impact of COVID-19 on Small-Scale Fishers of Trang Province, Thailand and Their Coping Strategies. Sustainability 2022, 14, 2865.

Journal reference: Sustainability 2022, 14, 2865
DOI: 10.3390/su14052865

Abstract

Researchers have reported various impacts of the COVID-19 outbreak on small-scale fishers, such as stagnating market demands, reduction of market price and income, etc. While literature have heeded to these impacts in a relatively short time frame, scant evidence exists on the changing impacts over time and on the detailed processes of how fishers have been coping with the challenges in a longer time period. Furthermore, few studies have comprehensively analysed the impacts and strategies from multiple perspectives. This study aims to explore the perceived impacts of the COVID-19 outbreak on small-scale fishing communities and to highlight the coping strategies adopted by fishers over a year since the initial outbreak, through a case study in Trang Province, Thailand. Analysis of both qualitative and quantitative data obtained through semi-structured interviews indicated that fishers wisely utilised natural, financial and social capitals at the early stages of the outbreak, while human capitals were essential for recovering from the impacts in the later stages. Our findings suggest that the adaptive capacity to flexibly change livelihood strategies are crucial, while alternative income source may not necessarily help small-scale fishers under stagnating global economy.

Keywords

small-scale fishers; resilience; Adaptive Cycle Model; Sustainable Livelihood Framework; COVID-19; coping strategy; alternative livelihood; Trang Province; Thailand

Subject

SOCIAL SCIENCES, Sociology

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