Preprint Review Version 2 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Genetics, Molecular Control and Clinical Relevance of Habituation Learning

Version 1 : Received: 12 January 2022 / Approved: 13 January 2022 / Online: 13 January 2022 (10:57:23 CET)
Version 2 : Received: 5 May 2022 / Approved: 6 May 2022 / Online: 6 May 2022 (08:58:50 CEST)

How to cite: Blok, L.E.; Boon, M.; van Reijmersdal, B.; Höffler, K.D.; Fenckova, M.; Schenck, A. Genetics, Molecular Control and Clinical Relevance of Habituation Learning. Preprints 2022, 2022010186 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202201.0186.v2). Blok, L.E.; Boon, M.; van Reijmersdal, B.; Höffler, K.D.; Fenckova, M.; Schenck, A. Genetics, Molecular Control and Clinical Relevance of Habituation Learning. Preprints 2022, 2022010186 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202201.0186.v2).

Abstract

Habituation is the most ancient and fundamental form of learning. As a firewall that protects our brain from sensory overload, it is indispensable for higher cognitive processes. Studies in humans and animal models provide a growing body of evidence that habituation is affected in autism and related monogenic neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs). An integrated application of habituation assessment in NDDs and their animal models has currently unexploited potential for fundamental neuroscience and medical care.With the aim to gain mechanistic insights, we systematically retrieved genes that have been demonstrated in the literature to underlie habituation. We identified 258 evolutionarily conserved genes across species, describe the biological processes they converge on, and highlight regulatory pathways and drugs that may alleviate the habituation deficits associated with their dysregulation. We also summarize current habituation paradigms and extract the most decisive arguments from the literature that support the crucial role of habituation for cognition in health and disease. We conclude that habituation is a conserved, quantitative, cognition- and disease-relevant process that can connect preclinical and clinical work, and hence is a powerful tool to advance research, diagnostics,’’ and treatment of NDDs.

Keywords

Habituation; Genelist; Molecular pathway; Cognition; Neurodevelopmental disorders

Subject

BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES, Behavioral Neuroscience

Comments (1)

Comment 1
Received: 6 May 2022
Commenter: Michaela Fenckova
Commenter's Conflict of Interests: Author
Comment: adapted abstract, keywords and main text, added figure (Figure 1)
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