Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Deciding on Optical Illusions: Reduced Alpha Power in Body Dysmorphic Disorder

Version 1 : Received: 4 January 2022 / Approved: 6 January 2022 / Online: 6 January 2022 (09:44:14 CET)

How to cite: Giannopoulos, A.E.; Zioga, I.; Kontoangelos, K.; Papageorgiou, P.; Kapsali, F.; Capsalis, C.Ν.; Papageorgiou, C. Deciding on Optical Illusions: Reduced Alpha Power in Body Dysmorphic Disorder. Preprints 2022, 2022010053 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202201.0053.v1). Giannopoulos, A.E.; Zioga, I.; Kontoangelos, K.; Papageorgiou, P.; Kapsali, F.; Capsalis, C.Ν.; Papageorgiou, C. Deciding on Optical Illusions: Reduced Alpha Power in Body Dysmorphic Disorder. Preprints 2022, 2022010053 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202201.0053.v1).

Abstract

Background: Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is a psychiatric disorder characterized by excessive preoccupation with imagined defects in appearance. Optical illusions induce illusory effects that distort the presented stimulus thus leading to ambiguous percepts. Using electroencephalography (EEG), we investigated whether BDD is related to differentiated perception during illusory percepts. Methods: 18 BDD patients and 18 controls were presented with 39 optical illusions together with a statement testing whether or not they perceived the illusion. After a delay period, they were prompted to answer whether the statement is right/wrong and their degree of confidence for their answer. We investigated differences of BDD on task performance and self-reported confidence and analysed the brain oscillations during decision-making using nonparametric cluster statistics. Results: Behaviorally, the BDD group exhibited reduced confidence when responding incorrectly, potentially attributed to higher levels of doubt. Electrophysiologically, the BDD group showed significantly reduced alpha power at mid-central scalp areas, suggesting impaired allocation of attention. Interestingly, the lower the alpha power of the identified cluster, the higher the BDD severity, as assessed by BDD psychometrics. Conclusions: Results evidenced that alpha power during illusory processing might serve as a quantitative EEG biomarker of BDD, potentially associated with reduced inhibition of task-irrelevant areas.

Keywords

body dysmorphic disorder; EEG; optical illusions; alpha oscillations

Subject

BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES, Behavioral Neuroscience

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