Preprint Concept Paper Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Appraisal of Experimental Methods to Manage Menopause and Infertility: Intraovarian Platelet-Rich Plasma vs. Condensed Platelet-Derived Cytokines

Version 1 : Received: 17 November 2021 / Approved: 18 November 2021 / Online: 18 November 2021 (13:56:53 CET)

How to cite: Sills, E.S.; Wood, S.H. Appraisal of Experimental Methods to Manage Menopause and Infertility: Intraovarian Platelet-Rich Plasma vs. Condensed Platelet-Derived Cytokines. Preprints 2021, 2021110328 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202111.0328.v1). Sills, E.S.; Wood, S.H. Appraisal of Experimental Methods to Manage Menopause and Infertility: Intraovarian Platelet-Rich Plasma vs. Condensed Platelet-Derived Cytokines. Preprints 2021, 2021110328 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202111.0328.v1).

Abstract

The first published description of intraovarian platelet-rich plasma (PRP) appeared in mid-2016, when a new experimental technique was successfully used in adult human ovaries to correct the reduced fertility potential accompanying advanced maternal age. Considering the potential therapeutic scope of intraovarian activated PRP and/or condensed platelet cytokines would likely cover both menopause treatment and infertility, the mainstream response has ranged from skeptical disbelief to welcome astonishment. Indeed, reports of restored menses in menopause (as an alternative to conventional hormone replacement therapy) and healthy term livebirths for infertility patients (either with IVF or as unassisted conceptions) after intraovarian PRP injection continue to draw notice. Yet any proper criticism of ovarian PRP applications will be difficult to rebut given the heterogenous patient screening, varied sample preparations, wide differences in platelet incubation and activation protocols, surgical/anesthesia techniques, and delivery methods. Notwithstanding these features, no adverse events have been reported thus far and ovarian PRP appears well tolerated by patients. Here, early research guiding the transition of ‘ovarian rejuvenation’ from experimental to clinical is outlined. Likely mechanisms are presented to explain results observed in both veterinary and human ovarian PRP research. Current and future challenges for intraovarian cytokine treatment are also discussed.

Keywords

platelets; cytokines; angiogenesis; embryo; menopause; fertility

Subject

MEDICINE & PHARMACOLOGY, Obstetrics & Gynaecology

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