Preprint Review Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Exploring the Societal Burden of Endometriosis on Women: a Metaethnography

Version 1 : Received: 14 September 2021 / Approved: 20 September 2021 / Online: 20 September 2021 (16:14:24 CEST)

How to cite: Nwankudu, O.C.; Idris, I.O.; Ayomoh, F.I.; Onyes, U. Exploring the Societal Burden of Endometriosis on Women: a Metaethnography. Preprints 2021, 2021090345 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202109.0345.v1). Nwankudu, O.C.; Idris, I.O.; Ayomoh, F.I.; Onyes, U. Exploring the Societal Burden of Endometriosis on Women: a Metaethnography. Preprints 2021, 2021090345 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202109.0345.v1).

Abstract

Background: Endometriosis affects between 1% to 10% of women worldwide; it is associated with a significant burden on the woman, her relationships, productivity, mental health, family and society. Aim:To contribute to the current understanding of the impact of endometriosis on women’s lives by integrating qualitative research findings to explore the illness experiences of women living with endometriosis. Study design:Synthesis of qualitative data using Britten’s meta-ethnography.Methods:Six bibliographic databases (Medline, Embase, CINAHL, Web of Science, Scopus and PsycINFO) and Google Scholar were searched for peer-reviewed papers published in English language from inception of until August 6th 2021. Results: Fifteen studies were included in the data synthesis. The review included a total of 354 women from fourteen countries (including South Africa, Iran, England, Australia and United States of America), of age range 16-78 years. Subjects represented diverse ethnicities, cultures and native languages distributed across socioeconomic classes. Representation of all stages of endometriosis was included.Findings incorporate the following nine categories into a conceptual model: disease symptoms; health services experience; isolation and limited social participation; limited physical functioning; a coterie of emotions; sex and intimate relationships; infertility; work life and education; coping strategies and support. Diagnostic delays, persistent symptoms, healthcare costs and inadequate education to patients about the disease; all intersect into a web of struggles and incoherence for patients. Conclusion:Women with endometriosis living in various countries report similar illness experiences; although gender roles, culture and socio-economic status may act as mediating factors that shape an individual’s illness experience.

Keywords

endometriosis; qualitative research; gynaecology; infertility; illness experience; health service

Comments (0)

We encourage comments and feedback from a broad range of readers. See criteria for comments and our diversity statement.

Leave a public comment
Send a private comment to the author(s)
Views 0
Downloads 0
Comments 0
Metrics 0


×
Alerts
Notify me about updates to this article or when a peer-reviewed version is published.
We use cookies on our website to ensure you get the best experience.
Read more about our cookies here.