Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Lowland Bamboo (Oxytenanthera abyssinica) Deforestation and Subsequent Cultivation Effects on Soil Physico-Chemical Properties in Southwestern Ethiopia

Version 1 : Received: 27 May 2021 / Approved: 31 May 2021 / Online: 31 May 2021 (10:37:49 CEST)

How to cite: Tadesse, Z.; Abere, M.; Bayu, B.; Pan, K.; Mulatu, Y.; Francis Justine, M. Lowland Bamboo (Oxytenanthera abyssinica) Deforestation and Subsequent Cultivation Effects on Soil Physico-Chemical Properties in Southwestern Ethiopia. Preprints 2021, 2021050734 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202105.0734.v1). Tadesse, Z.; Abere, M.; Bayu, B.; Pan, K.; Mulatu, Y.; Francis Justine, M. Lowland Bamboo (Oxytenanthera abyssinica) Deforestation and Subsequent Cultivation Effects on Soil Physico-Chemical Properties in Southwestern Ethiopia. Preprints 2021, 2021050734 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202105.0734.v1).

Abstract

In Ethiopia, bamboo thickets and woodlands play an important role in soil-water conservation and climate change mitigation in arid and semi-arid regions. However, bamboo mass flower-ing, rapid demographic changes and expansion of agricultural investments to bamboo domi-nated areas have led to deforestation and land degradation. In this study, we determined the effects of deforestation and subsequent cultivation on soil physical and chemical properties along a chronosequence of closely located agricultural lands with different ages (1, 3, 5 and 7 years) since converted from natural lowland bamboo forest. Hence, soil samples (n = 90) have been taken from both natural bamboo forests and adjacent agricultural lands at two soil depths (0-20 cm and 20-40 cm). Our result showed that CEC, K+, Ca+, Mg+ and available P were varied significantly with respect to cultivation periods and soil depth, while soil pH and Na+ varied with soil depth (P < 0.001). Soil C and total N contents (g/kg) in 0-20 cm soil layer declined significantly and exponentially with increasing years under cultivation. Conversion of natural bamboo forest to cropland during the past seven-year period significantly increased soil pH with soil depths, while CEC was declined throughout the cultivation period and soil depth. In general, the result revealed that conversion of natural lowland bamboo and subsequent cultivation of soil had negative effects on measured soil physicochemical properties.

Subject Areas

Land use change; soil quality; Lowland bamboo; Cultivation periods; Ethiopia

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