Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Integrating Geomorphological Data, Geochronology, and Archaeological Evidence for Coastal Landscape Reconstruction. The Case of Ammoudara Beach, Crete

Version 1 : Received: 12 April 2021 / Approved: 13 April 2021 / Online: 13 April 2021 (11:42:17 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Alexandrakis, G.; Petrakis, S.; Kampanis, N.A. Integrating Geomorphological Data, Geochronology and Archaeological Evidence for Coastal Landscape Reconstruction, the Case of Ammoudara Beach, Crete. Water 2021, 13, 1269. Alexandrakis, G.; Petrakis, S.; Kampanis, N.A. Integrating Geomorphological Data, Geochronology and Archaeological Evidence for Coastal Landscape Reconstruction, the Case of Ammoudara Beach, Crete. Water 2021, 13, 1269.

Journal reference: Water 2021, 13, 1269
DOI: 10.3390/w13091269

Abstract

Understanding the processes that govern the transformation of the landscape through time is essential for exploring the evolution of a coastal area. Coastal landscapes are dynamic sites, with their evolution strongly linked with waves and sea-level variations. Geomorphological features in the coastal area, such as beachrock formations and dune fields, can function as indicators of the coastal landscape evolution through time. However, our knowledge of the chronological framework of coastal deposits on the Aegean coasts is limited. Optically stimulated luminescence dating techniques are deemed to be very promising indirect dating of the coastal sediments, especially when they are linked with archaeological evidence. The dating of the sediments from different sediment core depths, as they are determined by the method of luminosity, allows us to calculate the rate of sediment deposition over time. Additionally, the coastal evolution and stability were studied from 1945 until today, with the use of aerial photographs and satellite images. This paper presents the 6000 ka years evolution of a coastal landscape based on geomorphological, archaeological, and radio-chronological data. Based on the results, the early stages of the Ammoudara beach dune field appear to be formed ~9.0 – 9.6 ka BP, while the OSL ages from 6 m depth represented the timing of its stabilization (OSL ages ~5–6 ka). This indicates that the dune field appears to already have been formed long before the Bronze Age (5-10 ka BP) and became stabilized with only localized episodes of dune reactivation occurring, while high coastal erosion rates are found in modern times.

Subject Areas

Sea level changes; Luminescence dating; coastal archaeology; landscape reconstruction; Bronze age; Crete

Comments (0)

We encourage comments and feedback from a broad range of readers. See criteria for comments and our diversity statement.

Leave a public comment
Send a private comment to the author(s)
Views 0
Downloads 0
Comments 0
Metrics 0


×
Alerts
Notify me about updates to this article or when a peer-reviewed version is published.
We use cookies on our website to ensure you get the best experience.
Read more about our cookies here.