Working Paper Article Version 2 This version is not peer-reviewed

Virus Host Jumping Can Be Boosted by Adaptation to a Bridge Plant Species

Version 1 : Received: 15 March 2021 / Approved: 16 March 2021 / Online: 16 March 2021 (15:03:46 CET)
Version 2 : Received: 17 March 2021 / Approved: 18 March 2021 / Online: 18 March 2021 (10:17:39 CET)
Version 3 : Received: 18 March 2021 / Approved: 19 March 2021 / Online: 19 March 2021 (11:24:18 CET)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Martínez-Turiño, S.; Calvo, M.; Bedoya, L.C.; Zhao, M.; García, J.A. Virus Host Jumping Can Be Boosted by Adaptation to a Bridge Plant Species. Microorganisms 2021, 9, 805. Martínez-Turiño, S.; Calvo, M.; Bedoya, L.C.; Zhao, M.; García, J.A. Virus Host Jumping Can Be Boosted by Adaptation to a Bridge Plant Species. Microorganisms 2021, 9, 805.

Journal reference: Microorganisms 2021, 9, 805
DOI: 10.3390/microorganisms9040805

Abstract

Understanding biological mechanisms that regulate emergence of viral diseases, in particular those events engaging cross-species pathogens spillover, are becoming increasingly important in Virology. Species barrier jumping has been extensively studied in animal viruses, and the critical role of a suitable intermediate host in animal viruses-generated human pandemics is highly topical. However, studies on host jumping involving plant viruses have been focused on shifting intra-species, leaving aside the putative role of “bridge hosts” in facilitating interspecies crossing. Here, we take advantage of several VPg mutants, derived from a chimeric construct of the potyvirus Plum pox virus (PPV), analysing its differential behaviour in three herbaceous species. Our results showed that two VPg mutations in a Nicotiana clevelandii-adapted virus, emerged during adaptation to the bridge-host Arabidopsis thaliana, drastically prompted partial adaptation to Chenopodium foetidum. Although, both changes are expected to facilitate productive interactions with eIF(iso)4E, polymorphims detected in PPV VPg and the three eIF(iso)4E studied, extrapolated to a recent VPg:eIF4E structural model, suggested that two adaptation ways can be operating. Remarkably, we found that VPg mutations driving host-range expansion in two non-related species, not only are not associated with cost trade-off constraints in the original host, but also improve fitness on it.

Subject Areas

Host jumping; viral evolution; trade-off; plant virus; RNA virus; Potyvirus; Plum pox virus

Comments (1)

Comment 1
Received: 18 March 2021
Commenter: Juan Antonio Garcia
Commenter's Conflict of Interests: Author
Comment: None of the modifications compromise the main message of the research
- María Calvo current address was modified
- Figure 5B (VPg alignment, very ending part, was adjusted)
- Supplementary Figure S1 (positions of VPg/Pro boxes were relocated)
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