Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Psychosocial and Diet-Related Lifestyle Clusters in Overweight and Obesity

Version 1 : Received: 5 March 2021 / Approved: 5 March 2021 / Online: 5 March 2021 (21:27:00 CET)

How to cite: Godoy-Izquierdo, D.; Lara, R.; Ogallar, A.; Rodríguez-Tadeo, A.; Ramírez, M.J.; Navarrón, E.; Arbinaga, F. Psychosocial and Diet-Related Lifestyle Clusters in Overweight and Obesity. Preprints 2021, 2021030198 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202103.0198.v1). Godoy-Izquierdo, D.; Lara, R.; Ogallar, A.; Rodríguez-Tadeo, A.; Ramírez, M.J.; Navarrón, E.; Arbinaga, F. Psychosocial and Diet-Related Lifestyle Clusters in Overweight and Obesity. Preprints 2021, 2021030198 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202103.0198.v1).

Abstract

This study explored intraindividual multidimensional profiles integrating psychosocial factors, namely, body image and satisfaction, weight-related self-stigma, positivity, and happiness, and behavioural-lifestyle factors, namely, adherence to a healthy diet, among Spanish adults with overweight or obesity. We further aimed to investigate the association of excess weight (i.e., measured body mass index, BMI) with the abovementioned multidimensional configurations. A convenience sample of adult individuals with excessive weight completed self-reports regarding the study variables, and their weight and height were measured. With a perspective centred on the individual, a cluster analysis established three distinct intraindividual psychosocial and diet-related profiles: a group of healthy individuals with excess weight; a group of individuals who were negatively affected by their excessive weight and showed the most distressed profile; and a group of dysfunctional individuals who seemed to be excessively unrealistic and optimistic regarding their excessive weight and unhealthy lifestyles. Furthermore, individuals in the affected cluster had higher obesity. The results showed that there are specific psychosocial and lifestyle profiles in the adult population with excess weight and that there are relationships among psychological, behavioural, and body-composition factors. For clinical application purposes, it is important to account for the heterogeneity within individuals who are obese.

Keywords

body image; healthy diet; weight-related stigma; subjective well-being; excessive weight; cluster analysis

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