Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Untargeted Proteomics-Based Approach to Investigate Unintended Changes in Genetically Modified Maize Used for Food and Feed Purposes

Version 1 : Received: 10 November 2020 / Approved: 13 November 2020 / Online: 13 November 2020 (09:27:08 CET)

How to cite: Agapito-Tenfen, S.Z.; Guerra, M.P.; Nodari, R.O.; Wikmark, O. Untargeted Proteomics-Based Approach to Investigate Unintended Changes in Genetically Modified Maize Used for Food and Feed Purposes. Preprints 2020, 2020110367 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202011.0367.v1). Agapito-Tenfen, S.Z.; Guerra, M.P.; Nodari, R.O.; Wikmark, O. Untargeted Proteomics-Based Approach to Investigate Unintended Changes in Genetically Modified Maize Used for Food and Feed Purposes. Preprints 2020, 2020110367 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202011.0367.v1).

Abstract

Profiling technologies, such as proteomics, allow the simultaneous measurement and comparison of thousands of plant components without prior knowledge of their identity. The combination of these non-targeted methods facilitates a more comprehensive approach than targeted methods and thus provides additional opportunities to identify genotypic changes resulting from genetic modification, including new allergens or toxins. The purpose of this study was to investigate unintended changes in GM Bt maize grown in South Africa. In the present study, we used bi-dimensional gel electrophoresis based on fluorescence staining, coupled with mass spectrometry in order to compare the proteome of the field-grown transgenic hybrid (MON810) and its near-isogenic counterpart. Proteomic data showed that energy metabolism and redox homeostasis were unequally modulated in GM Bt and non-GM maize variety samples. In addition, a potential allergenic protein – pathogenesis related protein -1 has been identified in our sample set. These finding highlight the suitability of unbiased profiling approaches to complement current GMO risk assessment practices worldwide.

Subject Areas

Transgenic organisms; 2-D DIGE; profiling techniques; maize; allergenicity assessment.

Comments (0)

We encourage comments and feedback from a broad range of readers. See criteria for comments and our diversity statement.

Leave a public comment
Send a private comment to the author(s)
Views 0
Downloads 0
Comments 0
Metrics 0


×
Alerts
Notify me about updates to this article or when a peer-reviewed version is published.
We use cookies on our website to ensure you get the best experience.
Read more about our cookies here.