Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Prevalence and Correlates of Heavy Episodic Alcohol Consumption Among Adults in Ecuador: Results of the First National STEPS Survey in 2018

Version 1 : Received: 11 November 2020 / Approved: 12 November 2020 / Online: 12 November 2020 (09:49:51 CET)

How to cite: Pengpid, S.; Peltzer, K. Prevalence and Correlates of Heavy Episodic Alcohol Consumption Among Adults in Ecuador: Results of the First National STEPS Survey in 2018. Preprints 2020, 2020110337 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202011.0337.v1). Pengpid, S.; Peltzer, K. Prevalence and Correlates of Heavy Episodic Alcohol Consumption Among Adults in Ecuador: Results of the First National STEPS Survey in 2018. Preprints 2020, 2020110337 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202011.0337.v1).

Abstract

The study aimed to assess the prevalence and correlates of heavy episodic drinking (HED) among adults in Ecuador. In the national cross-sectional 2018 Ecuador STEPS survey, 4,638 persons (median age=39 years, range 18-69 years) responded to a questionnaire, physical measures, and biomedical tests. Results indicate that 24.1% had past month HED, 36.7% among men, and 12.0% of women; 40.6% past month HED among past 12-month drinkers. In adjusted logistic regression analysis, male sex (Adjusted Odds Ratio=AOR: 3.12, 95% Confidence Interval=CI: 2.50-3.89), past smoking (AOR: 1.38, 95% CI: 1.09-1.76), and current smoking (AOR: 2.83, 95% CI: 2.15-3.83) were positively and persons aged 50-69 years (AOR: 0.50, 95% CI: 0.38-0.66) and having underweight (AOR: 0.28, 95% CI: 0.09-0.89) were negatively associated with HED. In addition, in sex-stratified analyses, among men, being African Ecuadorean or Mulato (AOR: 1.79, 95% CI: 1.10-2.91), and high physical activity (AOR: 1.41, 95% CI: 1.01-1.99) were positively associated with HED, and among women, being Montubia (AOR: 0.40, 95% CI: 0.17-0.93) was negatively and obesity (AOR: 1.61, 95% CI: 1.06, 2.44) was positively associated with HED. Almost one in four participants engaged in HED, and several sociodemographic and health indicators were identified that may facilitate public health interventions for reducing HED.

Subject Areas

alcohol use; adults; health; Ecuador

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