Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Impact of Grip Strength in Patients with Unresectable Hepatocellular Carcinoma Treated with Lenvatinib

Version 1 : Received: 13 July 2020 / Approved: 15 July 2020 / Online: 15 July 2020 (08:45:55 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Endo, K.; Kuroda, H.; Kanazawa, J.; Sato, T.; Fujiwara, Y.; Abe, T.; Sato, H.; Kooka, Y.; Oikawa, T.; Sawara, K.; Takikawa, Y. Impact of Grip Strength in Patients with Unresectable Hepatocellular Carcinoma Treated with Lenvatinib. Cancers 2020, 12, 2146. Endo, K.; Kuroda, H.; Kanazawa, J.; Sato, T.; Fujiwara, Y.; Abe, T.; Sato, H.; Kooka, Y.; Oikawa, T.; Sawara, K.; Takikawa, Y. Impact of Grip Strength in Patients with Unresectable Hepatocellular Carcinoma Treated with Lenvatinib. Cancers 2020, 12, 2146.

Journal reference: Cancers 2020, 12, 2146
DOI: 10.3390/cancers12082146

Abstract

Although sarcopenia is characterized by a loss of muscle strength and skeletal muscle mass, few studies have evaluated the effect of muscle strength on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. We separately evaluated the impact of sarcopenia-related factors (grip strength [GS] and the skeletal muscle index [SMI]) on the survival among lenvatinib-treated unresectable HCC (u-HCC) patients. This single-center cohort study was conducted at a university hospital. The study population included 63 lenvatinib-treated u-HCC patients managed between April 2018 and April 2020. A decreased GS and decreased SMI were found in 21 (33.3%) and 22 (34.9%) patients, respectively. The overall survival (OS) of the normal GS group was significantly higher than that of the decreased GS group, while that of the normal and decreased SMI groups did not differ markedly. There were no significant differences in the progression-free survival between the normal GS and decreased GS groups or the normal SMI and decreased SMI groups. A multivariate Cox proportional hazards model showed that ALBI2b (hazard ratio [HR] 4.39) and a decreased GS (HR 3.55) were independently associated with an increased risk of poor prognosis. In addition to the hepatic functional reserve, a decreased GS was a poor prognostic factor in lenvatinib-treated u-HCC patients.

Subject Areas

sarcopenia; hepatocellular carcinoma; grip strength; skeletal muscle index; lenvatinib; modified albumin-bilirubin grade

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