Preprint Concept Paper Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Neuroethical Issues in Times of Health Crisis. What Roles for Neurosciences, IA, Neurotechnologies?

Version 1 : Received: 14 June 2020 / Approved: 15 June 2020 / Online: 15 June 2020 (06:32:47 CEST)

How to cite: Tabouy, L. Neuroethical Issues in Times of Health Crisis. What Roles for Neurosciences, IA, Neurotechnologies? . Preprints 2020, 2020060192 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202006.0192.v1). Tabouy, L. Neuroethical Issues in Times of Health Crisis. What Roles for Neurosciences, IA, Neurotechnologies? . Preprints 2020, 2020060192 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202006.0192.v1).

Abstract

How can neuroscience help everyone to live and care for our confined brains? Understanding and studying human behaviour allows us to measure the impact of such confinement on each of us and to identify those who need help. The challenges are to understand the psychological repercussions following confinement and to understand how neuroscience and neurotechnology can be very interesting tools for dealing with the health crisis. Neuroscience is changing our traditional philosophical and ethical views by providing information about the biological basis of our moral behaviour. The exception of the brain is at the heart of neuroethical thinking and discourse. Neuroethics is an interdisciplinary discipline placed at the intersection between the human sciences and the neurosciences, and aims to help understand how knowledge and research in neurosciences and neurotechnologies will affect the future of society, their impact on humans, relationships, daily life, the labour market ... but also how they can help and provide solutions and answers to the questions of citizens in a health crisis. But it's a double-edged sword, collecting and analyzing brain data in real time seems to be increasingly simple and within everyone's reach, without having the hindsight of the real meaning of these data, allowing one day to read people's thoughts, control them and manipulate them. It is becoming clear that the boundaries between medical and non-medical uses of neuroscience and neurotechnology are becoming very porous, inviting us to reflect on neuroethical issues in order to put safeguards on these uses.

Subject Areas

neurotechnologies; neuroscience; public health; brain-machine interface; artificial intelligence; coronavirus; COVID19; personal data; neuroethics; liability; stress; social isolation; containment

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