Working Paper Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Woody Species Structure and Regeneration Status in Kafta-Sheraro National Park Forest, Tigray Region, Ethiopia

Version 1 : Received: 27 February 2020 / Approved: 28 February 2020 / Online: 28 February 2020 (16:24:09 CET)

How to cite: temesgen, F.; Warkineh, B. Woody Species Structure and Regeneration Status in Kafta-Sheraro National Park Forest, Tigray Region, Ethiopia. Preprints 2020, 2020020446 temesgen, F.; Warkineh, B. Woody Species Structure and Regeneration Status in Kafta-Sheraro National Park Forest, Tigray Region, Ethiopia. Preprints 2020, 2020020446

Abstract

The natural vegetation study was conducted in Kafta-sheraro national park (KSNP) North, Ethiopia to explore floristic composition, structure and regeneration of woody species in the home of African elephant. In the park, the above information is not well documented which is necessary for conservation. Data were collected From August to December 2018. The vegetation data were collected from 161 quadrats of size 20m×20m, 5mx5m for shrub ̸ tree, sapling and seedling respectively. Individual trees and shrubs DBH >=2.5cm and height >=2m were measured using Tape meter and Clinometer respectively. DBH, frequency, density, basal area, and IVI were used for vegetation structure. A total of 70 woody species 46 (65.7%) trees, 18 (25.7%) shrubs and 6 (8.6%) tree ̸ shrub) were identified. The total basal area and density of 79.3 m2 ha-1, and 466 ±12.8 (S.E.) individuals ha-1 were calculated for 64 woody species. Fabaceae was the most dominant family occupied 16 species (23.0%) followed by Combretaceae 8 species (11.4%). Acacia mellifera and Combretum hartmannianum were the most dominant and frequent species. Abnormal patterns of selected woody species were dominantly identified. Regenerating status all the woody plant species was categorized as “Fair” (18.75%), “Poor” (7.81 %) and “None” (73.44%). However, there is good initiation for conservation of the park; still the vegetation of the park was threatened by firewood collection, charcoal production, fire, intensive farming, mining and over grazing. Therefore, the study area as the habitat for the population of the African elephant; the KSNP should be recommended the highest conservation priority and studied the soil seed bank of species having poor regeneration condition.

Subject Areas

Kafta-sheraro national park; woody species structure; regeneration status

Comments (0)

We encourage comments and feedback from a broad range of readers. See criteria for comments and our diversity statement.

Leave a public comment
Send a private comment to the author(s)
Views 0
Downloads 0
Comments 0
Metrics 0


×
Alerts
Notify me about updates to this article or when a peer-reviewed version is published.