Preprint Review Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

A Review on Dispersal Polymorphism in Wing-Dimorphic, Mono-Morphic, Wingless, and Range-Expanding Insects, and Experimental Designs for Sorting out Resident and Disperser Phenotypes

Version 1 : Received: 27 January 2020 / Approved: 29 January 2020 / Online: 29 January 2020 (04:09:55 CET)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Renault, D. A Review of the Phenotypic Traits Associated with Insect Dispersal Polymorphism, and Experimental Designs for Sorting out Resident and Disperser Phenotypes. Insects 2020, 11, 214. Renault, D. A Review of the Phenotypic Traits Associated with Insect Dispersal Polymorphism, and Experimental Designs for Sorting out Resident and Disperser Phenotypes. Insects 2020, 11, 214.

Journal reference: Insects 2020, 11, 214
DOI: 10.3390/insects11040214

Abstract

Dispersal represents a key life-history trait with several implications for the fitness of organisms, population dynamics and resilience, local adaptation, meta-population dynamics, range shifting and biological invasions. Plastic and evolutionary changes of dispersal traits have been intensively studied over the past decades in entomology, in particular in wing-dimorphic insects for which literature reviews are available. Importantly, dispersal polymorphism also exists in wing-monomorphic and wingless insects, and except for butterflies, fewer syntheses are available. In this perspective, by integrating the very last research in the fast moving field of insect dispersal ecology, this review article provides an overview of our current knowledge of dispersal polymorphism in insects. After having provided a definition of the main terms characterising insects’ movements, some of the most often used experimental methodologies for the separation of dispersers and residents in wing-monomorphic and wingless insects are presented. The existing knowledge on the morphological and life-history trait differences between resident and disperser phenotypes is then synthetized. The fourth part examines the effects of range expansion on dispersal traits and performance, in particular for insects from range edges and invasion fronts. Finally, some research perspectives are proposed in the last part of the review.

Subject Areas

entomology; foraging; movement; migration; behaviour; morphology; mating; reproduction; fecundity; range expansion

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