Working Paper Review Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

To What Extent should We Rely on Antibiotics to Reduce High Gonococcal Prevalence? Historical Insights from Mass-meningococcal Campaigns

Version 1 : Received: 15 January 2020 / Approved: 16 January 2020 / Online: 16 January 2020 (11:12:44 CET)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Kenyon, C. To What Extent Should We Rely on Antibiotics to Reduce High Gonococcal Prevalence? Historical Insights from Mass-Meningococcal Campaigns. Pathogens 2020, 9, 134. Kenyon, C. To What Extent Should We Rely on Antibiotics to Reduce High Gonococcal Prevalence? Historical Insights from Mass-Meningococcal Campaigns. Pathogens 2020, 9, 134.

Journal reference: Pathogens 2020, 9, 134
DOI: 10.3390/pathogens9020134

Abstract

In the absence of a vaccine, current antibiotic-dependent efforts to reduce the prevalence of Neisseria gonorrhoeae in high prevalence populations have been shown to result in extremely high levels of antibiotic consumption. No randomized controlled trials have been conducted to validate this strategy and an important concern of this approach is that it may induce antimicrobial resistance. To contribute to this debate, we assessed if mass treatment in the related species, Neisseria meningitidis, was associated with the emergence of antimicrobial resistance. To this end, we conducted a historical review of the effect of mass meningococcal treatment programmes on the prevalence of N. meningitidis and the emergence of antimicrobial resistance. We found evidence that mass treatment programmes were associated with the emergence of antimicrobial resistance.

Subject Areas

Neisseria gonorrhoeae; AMR; Neisseria meningitidis; commensal Neisseria

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