Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Polarizability-dependent Sorting of Microparticles Using Continuous-flow Dielectrophoretic Chromatography with a Frequency Modulation Method

Version 1 : Received: 2 December 2019 / Approved: 3 December 2019 / Online: 3 December 2019 (11:30:11 CET)

How to cite: Giesler, J.; Pesch, G.R.; Weirauch, L.; Schmidt, M.; Thöming, J.; Baune, M. Polarizability-dependent Sorting of Microparticles Using Continuous-flow Dielectrophoretic Chromatography with a Frequency Modulation Method. Preprints 2019, 2019120023 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201912.0023.v1). Giesler, J.; Pesch, G.R.; Weirauch, L.; Schmidt, M.; Thöming, J.; Baune, M. Polarizability-dependent Sorting of Microparticles Using Continuous-flow Dielectrophoretic Chromatography with a Frequency Modulation Method. Preprints 2019, 2019120023 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201912.0023.v1).

Abstract

The separation of microparticles with respect to different properties such as size and material is a research field of great interest. Dielectrophoresis, a phenomenon which is capable of addressing multiple particle properties at once, can be used to perform a chromatographic separation. However, the selectivity of current dielectrophoretic particle chromatography (DPC) techniques is limited. Here we show a new approach for DPC based on differences in the dielectrophoretic mobilities and the crossover frequencies of polystyrene particles. Both differences are addressed by modulating the frequency of the electric field to generate positive and negative dielectrophoretic movement to achieve multiple trap and release cycles of the particles. A chromatographic separation of different particle sizes revealed a voltage dependency of this method. Additionally, we showed the frequency bandwidth influence on separation using one example. The DPC method developed was tested with model particles but offers possibilities to separate a broad range of plastic and metal microparticles or cells and to overcome currently existing limitations in selectivity.

Subject Areas

dielectrophoresis; microparticles; chromatography; separation; polarizability

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