Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

The Effect of Hops (Humulus lupulus L.) Extract Supplementation on Weight Gain, Adiposity and Intestinal Function in Ovariectomized Mice

Version 1 : Received: 29 October 2019 / Approved: 31 October 2019 / Online: 31 October 2019 (02:22:34 CET)

How to cite: Hamm, A.; Manter, D.; Kirkwood, J.; Wolfe, L.; Cox-York, K.; Weir, T. The Effect of Hops (Humulus lupulus L.) Extract Supplementation on Weight Gain, Adiposity and Intestinal Function in Ovariectomized Mice. Preprints 2019, 2019100359 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201910.0359.v1). Hamm, A.; Manter, D.; Kirkwood, J.; Wolfe, L.; Cox-York, K.; Weir, T. The Effect of Hops (Humulus lupulus L.) Extract Supplementation on Weight Gain, Adiposity and Intestinal Function in Ovariectomized Mice. Preprints 2019, 2019100359 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201910.0359.v1).

Abstract

Estrogen decline during menopause is associated with altered metabolism, weight gain and increased risk for cardiometabolic diseases. The gut microbiota also plays a role in the development of cardiometabolic dysfunction and is also subject to changes associated with age-related hormone changes. Phytoestrogens are plant-based estrogen mimics that have gained popularity as dietary supplements for treatment or prevention of menopause-related symptoms. These compounds have the potential to both modulate and to be metabolized by the gut microbiota. Hops (Humulus lupulus L.) contain potent phytoestrogen precursors, which rely on microbial biotransformation in the gut to estrogenic forms. We supplemented ovariectomized (OVX) or sham-operated (SHAM) C57BL/6 mice, with oral estradiol (E2), a flavonoid-rich extract from hops, or a placebo carrier oil to observe effects on adiposity, inflammation, and gut bacteria composition. Hops extract and E2 protected against increased visceral adiposity and liver triglyceride accumulation in OVX animals. Surprisingly, we found no evidence of OVX having a significant impact on the overall gut bacterial community structure. We did find differences in abundance of Akkermansia muciniphila, which was lower with HE treatment relative to the OVX E2 treatment and to placebo in the SHAM group.

Subject Areas

adiposity; dysbiosis; hops; menopause; microbiota; 8-prenylnaringenin; obesity; ovariectomy

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