Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Isolation, Characterization, and Antimicrobial Profiling of Bacteria Found on Thika Level 5 Hospital Surfaces, Kenya

Version 1 : Received: 5 August 2019 / Approved: 7 August 2019 / Online: 7 August 2019 (03:37:10 CEST)

How to cite: Nyaruaba, R.; Mwaliko, C.; Wangari Ngugi, C. Isolation, Characterization, and Antimicrobial Profiling of Bacteria Found on Thika Level 5 Hospital Surfaces, Kenya. Preprints 2019, 2019080084 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201908.0084.v1). Nyaruaba, R.; Mwaliko, C.; Wangari Ngugi, C. Isolation, Characterization, and Antimicrobial Profiling of Bacteria Found on Thika Level 5 Hospital Surfaces, Kenya. Preprints 2019, 2019080084 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201908.0084.v1).

Abstract

Multiple studies have shown that hospital settings are poorly cleaned during terminal cleaning. The adequacy of these cleaning methods has been undermined by presence of multi drug resistant bacteria on hospital surfaces. This case is even more serious in developing countries leading to health care- associated infections that pose a great threat to patients, visitors and health care providers in hospital settings.This study used various microbiological techniques to test for antibiotic susceptibility profiles of bacteria present at Thika Level 5 Hospital surfaces, Kenya. A simple random cross sectional study was performed, with a total of 85 samples being collected from five different sites. The sites included male and female wards, health care personnel offices, latrine, and kitchen surfaces. Samples were collected using sterile swabs, dipped in normal saline, and transported to the laboratory within 2Hours for processing.Of the 85 plates cultured, 47 plates showed bacterial growth (55%) on selective media with a significant P value of 0.0357. Seven different species of bacteria were identified biochemically from all sites, Escherichia coli was the most abundant species (28%), and the least was Salmonella typhii (5%). Multiple drug resistance was common in the different bacteria identified. All isolates were resistant to chloramphenical and susceptible to gentamycin. The most resistant microorganism was Staphylococcus aureus (50%), and the least resistant microorganism was Klebsiella pneumoniae (12.5%). The antimicrobial resistant bacterial species identified in this study have been documented to cause serious health care associated infections. These results present a significant public health concern because there is a possibility of patients, staff and visitors contacting nosocomial infections when they come into contact with surfaces at Thika Level 5 Hospital surfaces, Kenya.

Subject Areas

hospital surfaces; antibiotics; identification; bacteria; Thika Level 5 Hospital

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