Preprint Review Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Toxin–Antitoxin Systems and Their Role in Maintaining the Pathogenic Potential of Causative Agents of Sapronoses

Version 1 : Received: 7 April 2019 / Approved: 8 April 2019 / Online: 8 April 2019 (10:49:35 CEST)

How to cite: Andryukov, B.G.; Somova, L.M.; Timchenko, N.F.; Bynina, M.P.; Lyapun, I.N. Toxin–Antitoxin Systems and Their Role in Maintaining the Pathogenic Potential of Causative Agents of Sapronoses. Preprints 2019, 2019040083 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201904.0083.v1). Andryukov, B.G.; Somova, L.M.; Timchenko, N.F.; Bynina, M.P.; Lyapun, I.N. Toxin–Antitoxin Systems and Their Role in Maintaining the Pathogenic Potential of Causative Agents of Sapronoses. Preprints 2019, 2019040083 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201904.0083.v1).

Abstract

In interepidemic periods, a sapronoses typically employs a variety of mechanisms for maintaining viability of its causative agent in terrestrial parasitic systems, associated with different adaptive strategies utilized by its populations to survive. Unlike spore-forming bacteria, causative agents of sapronoses use resistant cell forms, which is a viable but nonculturable (VBNC) state, and persistence. Implementation of these strategies is conditioned by effects of various stress factors of the habitat and is characterized by decreased metabolism, alteration of the morphology and physiology of bacterial cell, and cessation of its replication. It is important that the resistant forms of cells retain virulence and, as favorable conditions come, turn back into the active vegetative form again. The discovery of the genetic modules of bacterial toxin–antitoxin systems in recent years has made it possible to identify a number of complicated regulatory molecular mechanisms responsible for maintaining the pathogenic potential of resistant forms of causative agents of natural-focus sapronoses in interepidemic periods.

Subject Areas

toxin–antitoxin systems; toxin–antitoxin genetic module; sapronoses; resistant (dormant) cell form of bacteria; viable but nonculturable (VBNC) cell; persistence

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