Preprint Article Version 2 This version is not peer-reviewed

Vive la Difference! Effects of Natural and Conventional Wines on the Blood Alcohol Concentrations: A Randomized, Triple-Blind Controlled Study

Version 1 : Received: 26 February 2019 / Approved: 27 February 2019 / Online: 27 February 2019 (12:17:33 CET)
Version 2 : Received: 4 April 2019 / Approved: 4 April 2019 / Online: 4 April 2019 (11:23:33 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Ferrero, F.F.; Fadda, M.; De Carli, L.; Barbetta, M.; Sethi, R.; Pezzana, A. Vive la Difference! The Effects of Natural and Conventional Wines on Blood Alcohol Concentrations: A Randomized, Triple-Blind, Controlled Study. Nutrients 2019, 11, 986. Ferrero, F.F.; Fadda, M.; De Carli, L.; Barbetta, M.; Sethi, R.; Pezzana, A. Vive la Difference! The Effects of Natural and Conventional Wines on Blood Alcohol Concentrations: A Randomized, Triple-Blind, Controlled Study. Nutrients 2019, 11, 986.

Journal reference: Nutrients 2019, 11, 986
DOI: 10.3390/nu11050986

Abstract

Different alcoholic beverages can have different effects on blood alcohol concentrations (BAC) and neurotoxicity even if equalized for alcohol content by volume. Anecdotal evidence suggested that natural wine is metabolized differently from conventional wines. This triple-blind study compared the BAC of 55 healthy male subjects after consuming the equivalent of 2 units of alcohol of a natural or conventional wine over 3 mins in two separate sessions one week apart. BAC was measured using a professional breathalyzer every 20 mins after consumption for 2 hrs. The BAC curves in response to the two wines diverged significantly at twenty minutes, at forty minutes and also at their maximum concentrations (peaks), with the natural wine inducing a lower BAC than the conventional wine (T20 0.40 vs. 0.46 [p<0.0002], T40 0.49 vs. 0.53 [p<0.0015], peak 0.52 vs. 0.56 [p<0.0002]). These differences are likely related to the development of different amino acids and antioxidants in the two wines during their production. This in turn may affect the kinetics of alcohol absorption and metabolism. Other contributing factors may also include pesticide residues, differences in dry extract content and the use of indigenous or selected yeasts. Further studies are needed to fully understand why natural wines are metabolized differently from conventional wines.

Subject Areas

alcohol; natural wine; blood alcohol content; breathalyzer; pesticides

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