Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Assessing Language-Induced Motor Activity through Event Related Potentials and the Grip Force Sensor, an Exploratory Study

Version 1 : Received: 18 January 2019 / Approved: 21 January 2019 / Online: 21 January 2019 (11:03:56 CET)

How to cite: Pérez-Gay Juárez, F.; Labrecque, D.; Frak, V. Assessing Language-Induced Motor Activity through Event Related Potentials and the Grip Force Sensor, an Exploratory Study. Preprints 2019, 2019010207 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201901.0207.v1). Pérez-Gay Juárez, F.; Labrecque, D.; Frak, V. Assessing Language-Induced Motor Activity through Event Related Potentials and the Grip Force Sensor, an Exploratory Study. Preprints 2019, 2019010207 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201901.0207.v1).

Abstract

The link between language processing and motor systems has been the focus of increasing interest to Cognitive Neuroscience. Some classical papers studying Event Related Potentials (ERPs) induced by linguistic stimuli have found differences in electrophysiological activity when comparing action and non-action words; more specifically, a bigger p200 for action words. On the other hand, a series of studies have validated the use of a grip force sensor (GFS) to measure language-induced motor activity during both isolated words and sentence listening, finding that action words induce an augmentation in the grip force around 250-300 ms after the onset of the stimulus. The purpose of the present study is to combine both techniques to assess if the p200 is related to the augmentation of the grip force measured by a GFS. We measured ERP and GFS changes elicited by listening to action and non-action words while maintaining an active grasping task in 10 healthy subjects. Our results show that the amplitude of the p200 in central electrodes is correlated to the augmentation in the GFS around 300 ms induced by linguistic stimuli. To our knowledge, this is the first study where the electrophysiological activity and the changes in the grip force induced by auditory language processing are put together, opening new venues of interpretation for the sensorimotor interaction in language processing.

Subject Areas

language; motor system; event related potentials; action simulation; embodied semantics

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