Preprint Review Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Event-Based Quantum Mechanics: A Context for the Emergence of Classical Information

Version 1 : Received: 7 January 2019 / Approved: 10 January 2019 / Online: 10 January 2019 (06:48:12 CET)
Version 2 : Received: 3 February 2019 / Approved: 11 February 2019 / Online: 11 February 2019 (11:26:11 CET)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Licata, I.; Chiatti, L. Event-Based Quantum Mechanics: A Context for the Emergence of Classical Information. Symmetry 2019, 11, 181. Licata, I.; Chiatti, L. Event-Based Quantum Mechanics: A Context for the Emergence of Classical Information. Symmetry 2019, 11, 181.

Journal reference: Symmetry 2019, 11, 181
DOI: 10.3390/sym11020181

Abstract

This paper explores an event-based version of quantum mechanics which differs from the commonly accepted one, even though the usual elements of quantum formalism, e.g., the Hilbert space, are mantained. This version introduces as primary element the occurrence of micro-events induced by usual physical (mechanical, electromagnetic and so on) interactions. These micro-events correspond to state reductions and are identified with quantum jumps, already introduced by Bohr in his atomic model and experimentally well established today. Macroscopic bodies are defined as clusters of jumps; the emergence of classicality thus becomes understandable and time honoured paradoxes can be solved. In particular, we discuss the cat paradox in this context. Quantum jumps are described as temporal localizations of physical quantities; if the information associated with these localizations has to be finite, two time scales spontaneously appear: an upper cosmological scale and a lower scale of elementary "particles". This allows the interpretation of the Bekenstein limit like a particular informational constraint on the manifestation of a micro-event in the cosmos to which it belongs. The topic appears relevant in relation to recent discussions on possible spatiotemporal constraints on quantum computing.

Subject Areas

Bekenstein information; emergent time; localization; quantum jump; quantum measurements

Readers' Comments and Ratings (1)

Comment 1
Received: 11 January 2019
Commenter: Amrit Sorli
The commenter has declared there is no conflict of interests.
Comment: Quantum jumps are described as temporal localizations of physical quantities

This statement above is not correct. Nothing can be located in time, because time has only the mathematical existence.
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