Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

The Rise of English as the Language for Academic Publication: On Equity, Disadvantage and ‘Non-Nativeness’ as a Red Herring

Version 1 : Received: 20 December 2018 / Approved: 21 December 2018 / Online: 21 December 2018 (11:15:50 CET)

How to cite: Hultgren, A.K. The Rise of English as the Language for Academic Publication: On Equity, Disadvantage and ‘Non-Nativeness’ as a Red Herring. Preprints 2018, 2018120260 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201812.0260.v1). Hultgren, A.K. The Rise of English as the Language for Academic Publication: On Equity, Disadvantage and ‘Non-Nativeness’ as a Red Herring. Preprints 2018, 2018120260 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201812.0260.v1).

Abstract

Within the fields of English for Academic Purposes (EAP) and English for Research Publication Purposes (ERPP), there is an unquestioned orthodoxy that scholars with English as an Additional Language (EAL) are particularly disadvantaged by the pressure to publish in English (though see Kuteeva 2015 and debate between Hyland 2016a, 2016b and Politzer-Ahlesa et al. 2016). In this paper, I challenge this orthodoxy, raising questions about the evidence upon which it is based. Within a framework of ‘verbal hygiene’ (Cameron 1995, 2012), I will argue that the attention accorded to ‘non-nativeness’ may be disproportionate to its significance for publication success. I conclude by proposing some reorientations for researchers and practitioners in the field that centre on broadening the scope to encompass non-linguistic structures of inequity.

Subject Areas

EAL disadvantage; non-nativeness as a red herring; verbal hygiene; field reorientations

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