Preprint Article Version 2 This version is not peer-reviewed

Sorption to Biochar Impacts β-Glucosidase and Phosphatase Enzyme Activities

Version 1 : Received: 19 September 2018 / Approved: 19 September 2018 / Online: 19 September 2018 (08:32:01 CEST)
Version 2 : Received: 10 October 2018 / Approved: 11 October 2018 / Online: 11 October 2018 (07:49:15 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Foster, E.J.; Fogle, E.J.; Cotrufo, M.F. Sorption to Biochar Impacts β-Glucosidase and Phosphatase Enzyme Activities. Agriculture 2018, 8, 158. Foster, E.J.; Fogle, E.J.; Cotrufo, M.F. Sorption to Biochar Impacts β-Glucosidase and Phosphatase Enzyme Activities. Agriculture 2018, 8, 158.

Journal reference: Agriculture 2018, 8, 158
DOI: 10.3390/agriculture8100158

Abstract

Extracellular enzymes catalyze biogeochemical reactions in soil, cycling carbon and nutrients in agricultural systems. Enzymes respond quickly to soil management, including organic amendment inputs, such as biochar, a charcoal-like solid byproduct of bioenergy production. In a previous agricultural field trial, a pine biochar amendment caused an approximately 40% decrease in the enzyme activities of β-glucosidase (BG) and phosphatase (PHOS). The large surface area of the pine biochar has the potential to sorb nutrients and other organic molecules. To test if sorption caused decreased enzyme activity, we used a laboratory assay to quantify the activity of two sorbed enzymes: BG and acid PHOS, involved in the cycling of carbon and phosphorous. The enzymes were incubated with three solid phases: (1) the high surface area pine biochar, (2) the agricultural soil, and (3) a low surface area grass biochar, for an additional comparison. We quantified the sorbed enzymes at pH 6, 7, and 8, using a Bradford protein assay, and measured the immobilized enzyme activities via high-throughput fluorometric analysis. After sorption onto pine biochar, detectable BG and PHOS activity levels dropped by over 95% relative to the soil, supporting direct sorption as one mechanism that reduces enzyme activity in biochar amended soil. This laboratory assay demonstrated that sorption could account for the lack of priming of native soil organic matter and changes in soil phosphorous cycling after pine biochar addition.

Subject Areas

biochar; surface area; enzyme activity; immobilization; protein assay

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