Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Intercomparison between Switch 2.0 and GE MAPS Models for Simulation of High-Renewable Power Systems in Hawaii

Version 1 : Received: 31 August 2018 / Approved: 31 August 2018 / Online: 31 August 2018 (10:53:08 CEST)
Version 2 : Received: 21 December 2018 / Approved: 24 December 2018 / Online: 24 December 2018 (10:55:11 CET)

How to cite: Fripp, M. Intercomparison between Switch 2.0 and GE MAPS Models for Simulation of High-Renewable Power Systems in Hawaii. Preprints 2018, 2018080545 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201808.0545.v1). Fripp, M. Intercomparison between Switch 2.0 and GE MAPS Models for Simulation of High-Renewable Power Systems in Hawaii. Preprints 2018, 2018080545 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201808.0545.v1).

Abstract

Background: New open-source electric-grid planning models have the potential to improve power system planning and bring a wider range of stakeholders into the planning process for next-generation, high-renewable power systems. However, it has not yet been established whether open-source models perform similarly to the more established commercial models for power system analysis. This reduces their credibility and attractiveness to stakeholders, postponing the benefits they could offer. In this paper, we report the first model intercomparison between an open-source power system model and an established commercial production cost model. Results: We compare the open-source Switch 2.0 to GE Energy Consulting’s Multi Area Production Simulation (MAPS), considering 18 scenarios of renewable energy adoption in Hawaii. We find that after configuring Switch with similar inputs to MAPS, the two models agree closely on hourly and annual production from all power sources. Comparing production gave an R2 value of 0.996 across all energy sources and scenarios, with R2 values in the range of 69–100 percent for individual sources. Conclusions: Although some disagreement remains between the two models, this work indicates that Switch is a viable choice for renewable integration modeling, at least for the small power systems considered here.

Subject Areas

model intercomparison; renewable energy; production cost modeling; security-constrained unit commitment; open-source software

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