Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

The Effects of Visual Cues, Blindfold, Synesthetic Experience and Music Training on Pure-Tone Frequency Discrimination

Version 1 : Received: 29 August 2018 / Approved: 30 August 2018 / Online: 30 August 2018 (10:40:28 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Tse, C.K.; Yu, C. .-C. The Effects of Visual Cues, Blindfolding, Synesthetic Experience, and Musical Training on Pure-Tone Frequency Discrimination. Behav. Sci. 2019, 9, 2. Tse, C.K.; Yu, C. .-C. The Effects of Visual Cues, Blindfolding, Synesthetic Experience, and Musical Training on Pure-Tone Frequency Discrimination. Behav. Sci. 2019, 9, 2.

Journal reference: Behav. Sci. 2018, 9, 2
DOI: 10.3390/bs9010002

Abstract

How perceptual limits can be overcome has long been examined by psychologists. This study investigated whether visual cues, blindfolding, visual-auditory synesthetic experience and music training could facilitate a smaller frequency difference limen (FDL) in a gliding frequency discrimination test. It was hoped that the auditory limits could be overcome through visual facilitation, visual deprivation, involuntary cross-modal sensory experience or music practice. Ninety university students, with no visual or auditory impairment, were recruited for this one-between (blindfold/visual cue) and one-within (control/experimental session) designed study. A MATLAB program was prepared to test their FDL by an alternative forced-choice task (gliding upwards/gliding downwards/no change) and two questionnaires (Vividness of Mental Imagery Questionnaire & Projector-Associator Test) were used to assess their tendency to synesthesia. Participants with music training showed a significantly smaller FDL; on the other hand, being blindfolded, being provided with visual cues or having synesthetic experience before could not significantly reduce the FDL. However, the result showed a trend of reduced FDLs through blindfolding. This indicated that visual deprivation might slightly expand the limits in auditory perception. Overall, current study suggests that the inter-sensory perception can be enhanced through training but not though reallocating cognitive resources to certain modalities. Future studies are recommended to verify the effects of music practice on other perceptual limits.

Subject Areas

frequency difference limens; blindfold; visual cues; auditory-visual synesthesia; gliding frequencies; perceptual limit, common resource theory; multiple resource model

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