Preprint Review Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Natural Background and Anthropogenic Arsenic Enrichment in Florida Soils, Surface Water, and Groundwater: A Review with a Discussion on Public Health Risk

Version 1 : Received: 29 August 2018 / Approved: 30 August 2018 / Online: 30 August 2018 (05:13:13 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Missimer, T.M.; Teaf, C.M.; Beeson, W.T.; Maliva, R.G.; Woolschlager, J.; Covert, D.J. Natural Background and Anthropogenic Arsenic Enrichment in Florida Soils, Surface Water, and Groundwater: A Review with a Discussion on Public Health Risk. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 2278. Missimer, T.M.; Teaf, C.M.; Beeson, W.T.; Maliva, R.G.; Woolschlager, J.; Covert, D.J. Natural Background and Anthropogenic Arsenic Enrichment in Florida Soils, Surface Water, and Groundwater: A Review with a Discussion on Public Health Risk. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 2278.

Journal reference: Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 2278
DOI: 10.3390/ijerph15102278

Abstract

Florida geologic units and soils contain a wide range in concentrations of naturally-occurring arsenic. The average range of bulk rock concentrations is 1 to 13.1 mg/kg with concentrations in accessary minerals being over 1,000 mg/kg. Soils contain natural arsenic concentrations of between 0.18 and 2.06 mg/kg with organic-rich soils having the highest concentrations. Anthropogenic sources of arsenic have added about 610,000 metric tons of arsenic into the Florida environment since 1970, thereby increasing background concentrations in soils. The anthropogenic sources of arsenic in soils include: pesticides (used in Florida beginning in the 1890’s), fertilizers, chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood, soil amendments, cattle-dipping vats, chicken litter, sludges from water treatment plants, and others. The default Soil Cleanup Target Level (SCTL) in Florida for arsenic in residential soils is 2.1 mg/kg which is below some naturally-occurring background concentrations in soils and anthropogenic concentrations in agricultural soils. A review of risk considerations shows that adverse health impacts associated with exposure to arsenic is dependent on many factors and that the Florida cleanup levels are very conservative. Exposure to arsenic in soils at concentrations that exceed the Florida residential cleanup level in residential environments does not necessarily pose a meaningful public health risk.

Subject Areas

arsenic; florida; soils; geologic units; groundwater; exposure; public health risk

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