Preprint Article Version 3 This version is not peer-reviewed

Isolation and Characterization of Polymorphic Microsatellite loci from the Invasive Worm Branchiomma luctuosum (Grube, 1870) (Annelida: Sabellidae)

Version 1 : Received: 22 August 2018 / Approved: 23 August 2018 / Online: 23 August 2018 (08:34:24 CEST)
Version 2 : Received: 23 August 2018 / Approved: 24 August 2018 / Online: 24 August 2018 (03:57:15 CEST)
Version 3 : Received: 24 August 2018 / Approved: 27 August 2018 / Online: 27 August 2018 (05:59:35 CEST)

How to cite: Belato, F.A.; Costa-Paiva, E.; Vilasboa, A. Isolation and Characterization of Polymorphic Microsatellite loci from the Invasive Worm Branchiomma luctuosum (Grube, 1870) (Annelida: Sabellidae). Preprints 2018, 2018080409 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201808.0409.v3). Belato, F.A.; Costa-Paiva, E.; Vilasboa, A. Isolation and Characterization of Polymorphic Microsatellite loci from the Invasive Worm Branchiomma luctuosum (Grube, 1870) (Annelida: Sabellidae). Preprints 2018, 2018080409 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201808.0409.v3).

Abstract

Introduction of exotic species in new areas through anthropic action is one of the major problems that can affect biodiversity. Branchiomma luctuosum is known for its highly invasive potential and the actual occurrence of species commonly associated with port activity areas is an extra evidence that this anthropogenic activity should not be underestimated. In order to develop suitable molecular markers for future studies on colonization routes and population dynamics of the invading individuals of B. luctuosum, nine highly polymorphic microsatellite loci were isolated and their polymorphism levels were evaluated. These loci showed a range of number of alleles per locus from five to ten and all loci had a high level of genetic diversity, and exhibited significant heterozygote deficiencies probably due to the presence of null alleles. Significant deviations from the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium were detected at several loci and most of them were related to a heterozygous deficit. Heterozygous deficiency can be expected in this case due to the biology and history of this invasive species, in relation to its recent introduction in Brazilian coast and possible action of multiple introductory events.

Subject Areas

bioinvasion; molecular markers; fanworm; biofouling

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