Preprint Review Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Molecular and Genetic Bases of Fruit Firmness Variation in Blueberry—A Review

Version 1 : Received: 3 August 2018 / Approved: 5 August 2018 / Online: 5 August 2018 (10:11:33 CEST)

How to cite: Cappai, F.; Benevenuto, J.; Ferrao, L.F.V.; Munoz, P. Molecular and Genetic Bases of Fruit Firmness Variation in Blueberry—A Review. Preprints 2018, 2018080089 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201808.0089.v1). Cappai, F.; Benevenuto, J.; Ferrao, L.F.V.; Munoz, P. Molecular and Genetic Bases of Fruit Firmness Variation in Blueberry—A Review. Preprints 2018, 2018080089 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201808.0089.v1).

Abstract

Blueberry (Vaccinium spp.) has been recognized worldwide as a valuable source of health-promoting compounds, becoming a crop with some of the fastest rising consumer demand trends. Fruit firmness is a key target for blueberry breeding as it directly affects fruit quality, consumer preference, transportability, shelf life, and the ability of cultivars to be machine harvested. Fruit softening naturally occurs during berry development, maturation, and postharvest ripening. However, some genotypes are better at retaining firmness than others, and some are crispy, which is a putatively extra-firmness phenotype that provides a distinct eating experience. In this review, we summarized important studies addressing the firmness trait in blueberry, focusing on physiological and molecular changes affecting this trait at the onset of ripening and also the genetic basis of firmness variation across individuals. New insights into these topics were also achieved by using previously available data and historical records from the blueberry breeding program at the University of Florida. The complex quantitative nature of firmness in an autopolyploid species such as blueberry imposes additional challenges for the implementation of molecular techniques in breeding. However, we highlighted some recent genomics-based studies and the potential of a QTL mapping analysis and genome editing protocols such as CRISPR to further assist and accelerate the breeding process for this important trait.

Subject Areas

firmness; Vaccinium; ripening; cell wall; crispy; quantitative genetics; breeding; molecular markers; genome editing

Readers' Comments and Ratings (0)

Leave a public comment
Send a private comment to the author(s)
Rate this article
Views 0
Downloads 0
Comments 0
Metrics 0
Leave a public comment

×
Alerts
Notify me about updates to this article or when a peer-reviewed version is published.