Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Characterization of Keratinophilic Fungal Species and Other Non-Dermatophytes in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

Version 1 : Received: 12 July 2018 / Approved: 13 July 2018 / Online: 13 July 2018 (13:30:46 CEST)
Version 2 : Received: 17 September 2018 / Approved: 18 September 2018 / Online: 18 September 2018 (15:13:05 CEST)

How to cite: Alwakeel, S. Characterization of Keratinophilic Fungal Species and Other Non-Dermatophytes in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Preprints 2018, 2018070236 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201807.0236.v1). Alwakeel, S. Characterization of Keratinophilic Fungal Species and Other Non-Dermatophytes in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Preprints 2018, 2018070236 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201807.0236.v1).

Abstract

Background: The presence of fungal species on the surface skin and hair is a known finding in many mammalian species and humans are no exception. Superficial fungal infections are sometimes a chronic and recurring condition that affects approximately 10-20% of the world’s population. However, most species that are isolated from humans tend to occur as co-existing flora. This study was conducted to determine the diversity of fungal species isolated from the hair and nails of workers in the central region of Saudi Arabia where there are not many observational studies on the mycological species. Materials and Methods: Male workers from Riyadh, Saudi Arabia were recruited for this study and samples were obtained from their nails and hair for mycological analysis which was done using Saboraud’s agar and sterile wet soil. Fungal isolates were examined microscopically. Results: Twenty four hair samples yielded a total of 26 species from 19 fungal genera. Chaetomiumglobosum was the most commonly isolated fungal species followed by Emericellanidulans, Cochliobolusneergaardii, and Penicilliumoxalicum. Three fungal species were isolated from nail samples, namely, Alternariaalternata, Aureobasidiumpullulans, and Penicilliumchrysogenum. Most of the isolated fungal species (17 of the 26 or 65.38% of the isolated fungal species) have not been thoroughly characterised nor morphologically classified. Conclusion: This study demonstrates the presence of previously undescribed fungal species that contribute to the normal flora of the skin and its appendages and may have a role in their pathogenies.

Subject Areas

keratinophilic fungi, non-dermatophytes, fungal flora, hair, nails

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