Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Implementation of Control Flow Checking - A New Perspective Adopting Model-Based Software Design

Version 1 : Received: 3 August 2022 / Approved: 8 August 2022 / Online: 8 August 2022 (13:41:10 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Amel Solouki, M.; Sini, J.; Violante, M. Implementation of Control Flow Checking—A New Perspective Adopting Model-Based Software Design. Electronics 2022, 11, 3074. Amel Solouki, M.; Sini, J.; Violante, M. Implementation of Control Flow Checking—A New Perspective Adopting Model-Based Software Design. Electronics 2022, 11, 3074.

Journal reference: Electronics 2022, 11, 3074
DOI: 10.3390/electronics11193074

Abstract

A common requirement of embedded software in charge of safety tasks is to guarantee the identification of those Random Hardware Failures (RHFs) that can affect digital components. RHFs are unavoidable. For this reason, functional safety standards, like the ISO 26262 devoted to automotive applications, require embedded software designs able to detect and eventually mitigate them. For this purpose, various software-based error detection techniques have been proposed over the years, focusing mainly on detecting Control Flow Errors. Many Control Flow Checking (CFC) algorithms have been proposed to accomplish this task. However, applying these approaches can be difficult because their respective literature gives little guidance on the their practical implementation in high-level programming languages, and they have to be implemented in low-level code, e.g., assembly. Moreover, the current trend in the automotive industry is to adopt the so-called Model-Based Software Design approach, where an executable algorithm model is automatically translated into C or C++ source code. This paper presents two novelties: firstly, the compliance of the experimental data on the capabilities of Control Flow Checking (CFC) algorithms with the ISO 26262 automotive functional safety standard; Secondly, by the implementation of the CFC algorithm in the application behavioral model is automatically translated. There is no need to modify the code generator. The assessment was performed using a novel fault injection environment targeting a RISC-V (RV32I) microcontroller.

Keywords

fault injection; functional safety; automotive applications; fault tolerance

Subject

ENGINEERING, Electrical & Electronic Engineering

Comments (0)

We encourage comments and feedback from a broad range of readers. See criteria for comments and our diversity statement.

Leave a public comment
Send a private comment to the author(s)
Views 0
Downloads 0
Comments 0
Metrics 0


×
Alerts
Notify me about updates to this article or when a peer-reviewed version is published.

We use cookies on our website to ensure you get the best experience.
Read more about our cookies here.