Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Systems Design and Integration of Small Scale Nano and Picosatellites

Version 1 : Received: 22 July 2022 / Approved: 25 July 2022 / Online: 25 July 2022 (09:35:15 CEST)

How to cite: Naumann, P.; Umansky-Castro, J.S.; Peck, M.; Sands, T. Systems Design and Integration of Small Scale Nano and Picosatellites. Preprints 2022, 2022070368 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202207.0368.v1). Naumann, P.; Umansky-Castro, J.S.; Peck, M.; Sands, T. Systems Design and Integration of Small Scale Nano and Picosatellites. Preprints 2022, 2022070368 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202207.0368.v1).

Abstract

Within the past decade, the aerospace engineering industry has evolved outside the constraints of using single, large, custom satellites. Due to increased reliability and robustness of commercial off the shelf (COTS) printed circuit board (PCB) components, missions instead have transitioned towards deploying swarms of smaller satellites. This approach significantly decreases the mission cost by reducing custom engineering and deployment expenses. Nanosatellites are able to be quickly developed with a more modular design at lowered risk. The Alpha mission at Cornell Space Systems Studio is fabricated in this manner. However, for the purpose of this mission, only one satellite was initially developed. This manuscript will discuss a systems engineering approach to the development of this satellite. As a disclaimer, this manuscript is written from a systems perspective. Therefore it will follow many subsystems from a wide range of functionalities. The research in this manuscript was kept broad with the hope to contribute to the mission as a system, through a range of development phases including validation and verification of existing methods. The two systems that will be primarily focused on are the Attitude Control System (ACS) of the carrier nanosatellite (cubesat), and the RF communications on the ex-creted picosatellites (chipsat). Milestones achieved in chipsat RF include chipsat to chipsat communication, chipsat to SDR ground station communication, packet creation, error correction, appending a preamble, and filtering the signal. Achievements on the ACS side included controller traceability/verification and validation, software rigidity tests, hardware endurance testing, Kane damper and IMU tuning. These developments matured the technological readiness level (TRL) of our systems in preparation for satellite deployment.

Keywords

Systems Engineering; Kane Damper; Forward Error Correction; Matched Filtering

Subject

ENGINEERING, Mechanical Engineering

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