Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Social Capital and Community Resilience in Tōhoku-Oki: Lessons from the 2011 Great East Earthquake and Tsunami Disaster in Japan

Version 1 : Received: 3 April 2022 / Approved: 18 April 2022 / Online: 18 April 2022 (03:46:52 CEST)

How to cite: Siawsh, N.M.; Peszynski, K.; Young, L.; Vo-Tran, H. Social Capital and Community Resilience in Tōhoku-Oki: Lessons from the 2011 Great East Earthquake and Tsunami Disaster in Japan. Preprints 2022, 2022040152 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202204.0152.v1). Siawsh, N.M.; Peszynski, K.; Young, L.; Vo-Tran, H. Social Capital and Community Resilience in Tōhoku-Oki: Lessons from the 2011 Great East Earthquake and Tsunami Disaster in Japan. Preprints 2022, 2022040152 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202204.0152.v1).

Abstract

This paper investigates experiences of how local cultural norms and social capital influenced the disaster relief process following the 2011 GEJET disaster. To underline social capital’s multiple‐influence aspects, this paper draws from field research that focuses on collective and individual social capital in disaster relief to systematise the findings according to the social capital framework. The paper uncovers new effects of individual social capital and collective capital in a mega-disaster context, thus contributing to pushing the research agenda toward a more critical appraisal of individual social capital and collective capital. We contribute to the nascent but growing literature that clarifies the relationship between social capital and disaster resilience. A qualitative study was conducted to capture the essence of their shared experiences. Findings revealed three main themes capturing the essence of the research participants’ disaster experiences. First, disaster response relied mostly on locally driven relief due to a clear understanding of the local culture. Second, there was an urgency to establish a sense of normalcy by providing quality supplies that would help survivors. Third, Japanese gender roles and expectations were reflected in the disaster relief process. The themes establish a wide array of lived experiences that are important to reflect on the role social capital plays in the policy-making and needs assessment processes in post-disaster relief and response efforts. The findings provide insights for integrating social dimensions into a humanitarian aid culture as citizens work towards a sense of normalcy.

Keywords

Social Capital; Japan; Iwate Prefecture; Resilience; Sustainability

Subject

SOCIAL SCIENCES, Other

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